Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

07/10/2012

A Disregard for Intellectual Property Among the Younger Generation? Prevalent Piracy


Give me your content, Mate!

The digital highways and byways are becoming more and more crowded with mobile devices. These wonderful little gadgets are a boon to publishers in providing multiple avenues to get their content out in front of more readers/consumers. 

The mobiles also bring a downside, however — increased piracy! Seems these little devils, multiplying like horny energizer bunnies, are hard to police. ‘It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.’

You ask, “What the hell is a Bit Torrent site?” [I had to ask that question :)] Well, here is the definition link .

Lucia Moses provides some insight into how digital magazines are being ripped off through their mobile apps in this piece for Adweek

Publishers’ Online Headache

With tablets come opportunity, but also online piracy

With mobile devices, magazines have more ways than ever to distribute their content—and more ways of getting ripped off.

Like the music and movie businesses before them, magazines are getting their own taste of piracy with the spread of tablets and handheld mobile devices. It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.

Publishers say piracy is concentrated overseas where no sooner do they get a site shut down than another one pops up in its place. And with all the focus on distributing their content as widely as possible, they don’t really know the scope of the problem or what it’s costing them in lost sales.

“[It’s] a real problem for the future as we get a lot more of these devices out there and it becomes harder to police it,” said Declan Moore, president of publishing and digital media for the National Geographic Society. “There is a general concern that, among the younger generation, there is a disregard for intellectual property.”

With just a few keystrokes, he found an online search engine offering a full year’s worth of interactive Nat Geos (as well as what appeared to be a liberal selection of soft porn). “That’s not authorized, I’m pretty sure,” he said.

Dan Lagani, president of Reader’s Digest North America, said the pirated editions of Reader’s Digest that he sees tend to be lower-resolution and lack the interactivity that the magazine has built into its iPad, Kindle Fire and Nook versions. “It’s not the same consumer experience.”

Read and learn more

Get this Intriguing Publishing/Writing Blog on your Kindle 🙂

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: