Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

07/05/2013

The Rapid Rise of Digital Educational, Scholarly and Scientific Materials is Screwing Terms of Engagement B/T Publishers, Libraries and Universities


What is the status of library E-lending business models?

Damn that’s a long title! I shortened it some but just didn’t have the time to chop it anymore 🙂

Of course, it is a good thing that all the old-established business models binding print books, libraries and universities — as well as the old relationships b/t publishers, authors, agents, retailers and others — are being ‘re-thunk‘. After all ‘digital changes everything’ is an oft quoted publishers’ sentiment.

For those of you who just never had a reason to know, you won’t believe the intricacies involved in the old relationship (decades in development) between print publishers and community libraries, for instance. And how library lending policies were affected by the antitrust laws and the interaction b/t the American Library Association (ALA), Readers First group and the Association of American Publishers (AAP).

Tonight’s post clearly explains this print-publisher-library-lending-relationship — only to lead up to the big conundrum currently facing the publishing industry:

Establishing an effective e-publisher-library-lending policy and relationship 🙂 This is proving to be a real mental exercise.

After all, ‘e-books don’t wear out, so they can be loaned indefinitely. Customers don’t need to go to the library to check one out. E-books’ retail costs are less than those of hardcover books. The problem of digital piracy, particularly the widespread distribution of pirated library copies, is a significant risk. In our current digital culture, it’s clear that the old publisher/library model cannot be replicated without eroding book sales in the broader market or diminishing copyright protection for those who create content.’ – Tom Allen.

Publishers and librarians agree that new e-lending business models are needed now. But, what would these be?

The ALA’s “EBook Business Models for Public Libraries,” is a good start and also explained in tonight’s post — So, enjoy this insight by AAP president, Tom Allen, written for Bangor Daily News (BDN):

E-books strain relationship between book publishers and libraries

 

Book publishers often say, “Digital changes everything.”

They mean that the astonishing growth of digital content, the constantly expanding range of devices for reading and the rapid development of digital educational, scholarly and scientific materials are disrupting established business models and relationships between publishers, authors, agents, retailers and others. In addition, e-books constitute a disruptive technology that is altering the terms of engagement with publishers’ historic partners such as libraries and universities, and complicating new ones with “frenemies” such as Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Over many decades, book publishers and community libraries evolved a relatively uniform business model for books in print. Publishers sold copies of print books to libraries at established prices with the understanding that those books would be available to some people who could not afford or would otherwise not purchase them, and to others whose interest would be stimulated enough to purchase a copy. Libraries would loan books sequentially to one reader at a time, and the customer would visit the library to check out books and return them. This carefully managed arrangement suited the interests of libraries and publishers and carried substantial benefits for the public.

Enter e-books. They don’t wear out, so they can be loaned indefinitely. Customers don’t need to go to the library to check one out. E-books’ retail costs are less than those of hardcover books. The problem of digital piracy, particularly the widespread distribution of pirated library copies, is a significant risk. In our current digital culture, it’s clear that the old publisher/library model cannot be replicated without eroding book sales in the broader market or diminishing copyright protection for those who create content.

Book publishers and librarians agree that new business models for e-lending are essential. But what would these be? And how do these longtime partners reach some middle ground?

Read and learn more

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The Rapid Rise of Digital Educational, Scholarly and Scientific Materials is Screwing Terms of Engagement B/T Publishers, Libraries and Universities  

05/14/2010

American Association of Publishers’ First Annual Books Preview



Two reasons for this post:

First, to introduce those that may not be aware to the AAP (Association of American Publishers) and the ALA (American Library Association) and

Second, to point out that the ALA is a VOLUMN book buyer of new books for all their libraries and should be included in any book marketing plan.

Go to http://www.ala.org/ for more info on the ALA and

http://www.publishers.org/ for info on the AAP.

This press release from the AAP website:

AAP (Association of American Publishers) Inaugurates Fall Books Preview at ALA (American Library Association) Annual Conference

From the Inside(rs) Out: Book Editors and the New Titles They Love

Co-Sponsored by Library Journal and EarlyWord

New York, NY, May 5, 2010—The Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced today that its Trade Libraries Committee, in collaboration with Nancy Pearl, National Public Radio commentator, author of the Book Lust series, librarian action figure hero, and book lover rock star, will host its inaugural Fall Books Preview at the upcoming Annual Conference of the American Library Association in Washington, DC. The program, titled From the Inside(rs) Out: Book Editors and the New Titles They Love, will be held on Friday, June 25 from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in Room 103A of the Washington D.C. Convention Center just prior to the opening of the Exhibit floor.

Co-sponsored by leading library trade publications Library Journal and EarlyWord, and for the first time at an ALA Conference, the publishing world’s top editorial talent will share their passion for new fall titles in a program filled with behind-the-scenes stories and presented exclusively for the library community. The event will kick off the Conference’s Exhibit activities which get underway at 5:30 on Friday. The presenters will include:

Jamie Raab, Executive Vice President & Publisher, Grand Central Publishing (Hachette Book Group) presenting OOGY, by Larry Levin; and An Object of Beauty, by Steve Martin

Cal Morgan, VP/Editorial Director of the Harper Perennial, Harper paperbacks, and It Books (HarperCollins Publishers) presenting Celebrity Chekhov by Ben Greenman; and Blow by Blow by Detmar Blow and Tom Sykes

Susan Kamil, Senior Vice President, Editor In Chief, Random House and Editorial Director, Dial Press (Random House), presenting Let’s Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship, by Gail Caldwell; and Luka and the Fire of Life, By Salman Rushie

Ina Stern, Associate Publisher, Algonquin Books (Workman), presenting West of Here by Jonathan Evison; and Exley by Brock Clarke; and

Bob Weil, Executive Editor and Vice President, W.W. Norton, presenting Charlie Chan: The Life and Times of a Chinese Detective by Yunte Huang; and Because It is Wrong: Torture, Privacy, and Presidential Power in the Age of Terror by Charles Fried and Gregory Fried.

“The industry’s top editors are profoundly grateful to librarians as book buyers and book promoters in towns and cities across the country. Librarians and libraries have enormous influence on cultural life, bringing good books and good authors to their communities,” said Talia Sherer, Director of Library Marketing at Macmillan and Chair of the AAP Trade Libraries Committee. “Throughout the course of the Conference, librarians will be visiting booths and attending many educational seminars and meetings. We thought it fitting to kick off the Conference just before the doors open by talking about books, and just books. Having the event hosted by the beloved Nancy Pearl, one of the most admired librarians in the country, will be an added treat.”

AAP’s Inside(rs) Out session is open to all badge holders. For more information, contact AAP’s Tina Jordan at tjordan@publishers.org

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