Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

11/23/2013

Custom Publishing Can Help Sell Your Books


Custom Publishing Examples

How often have you heard a conversation something like this:

“Hell, man, having struggled through writing my novel I now find that THAT was the easy part. Marketing the damn thing and getting buyers and readers is ten times harder!”

True enough. Even if you’re a newbie with an agent and a big house publishing contract. They’re not going to throw big bucks behind an unknown — Oh sure, they will get you into a distribution system (like shelf space in a Barnes & Noble bookstore) for a short time, BUT, they are not going to fund major advertising for your book while it gathers dust on that bookshelf.

YOU’RE going to have to get the word out RE your own book and at your own expense (of course this also includes self-published e-books).

Everybody complains about marketing their own books — And you know why, don’t you? Because hardly any of us know beans about real marketing techniques — And what we do know is probably wrong — Hence, the poor results whenever we try to do any self-help marketing.

SO, this situation shouts at us to learn as much about marketing our books as we can; even to the point of taking some college training courses (or better yet, get the whole damn marketing degree if your situation allows).

Well, all that said, tonight’s post will discuss a good way to market your book by writing and publishing something ABOUT your book — this kind of publishing is called custom publishing, content marketing, custom media, branded media, etc. in our country and contract publishing and customer publishing in the UK.

If you can write a decent novel, you can do this. But, if you have some resources, let a professional custom publisher (a growing field now) handle it. They will have contacts/contracts to get the piece about your novel in the right places and the equipment and staff to make the piece professionally glossy and dynamic.

Some top custom publishers are Diablo Custom Publishing, TMG Custom Media, Rodale Grow and Pace. These firms were among custom publishing’s prominent firms gathered at the Liberty Theater in New York Monday night during the annual Pearl Awards presented by the Custom Content Council. TMG and Pace took home most of the gold Pearl awards.

More details at Virtual-Strategy Magazine:

Diablo Custom Publishing Takes Home Two Gold Pearl Awards

The Pearl Awards are an annual event created by the Custom Content Council, an international association, to honor excellence in editorial, design and strategy in the custom content industry.

Walnut Creek, CA (PRWEB) November 21, 2013

Diablo Custom Publishing (DCP) was honored with two Gold Pearl awards for its exceptional work in custom publishing on November 12, 2013, at the Pearl Awards ceremony held at the Highline Ballroom in New York City. DCP received a Gold Award for Best Opening Spread for the April 2013 edition of Giants magazine and a Gold Award for Best Feature Article/Package for UC Hastings, Spring 2013.

Giants magazine, the official magazine of the San Francisco Giants, is produced six times per baseball season. The magazine’s mission is to engage Giants fans through in-depth articles and personalized stories about the players and the Giants’ organization. The winning design features an action photo of Buster Posey taken during the 2012 National League Championship Series. The spread was designed by DCP designer Jake Watling, incorporating a photo from Missy Mikulecky, Director of Photography and Archives, San Francisco Giants.

Read more here

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07/28/2011

A New Way to Reinvent Book Publishing?


Unbound Publishing, the Kickstarter for books

How about getting the public’s opinion on the viability of a book story … AND THEN get them to contribute to its funding, story input and advance? Pretty cool, huh?

Well this business model is being fine-tuned, tweaked and used by Unbound Publishing in the United Kingdom.

“…with Unbound the funding for the book–as well as the fan’s approval process, which is very public–happens up front, and much more swiftly…and the marketing happens by word of mouth.”

Details by Kit Eaton in FastCompany.com :

Unbound’s Crowd-Financed, Spine-Tingling Effort To Reinvent Book Publishing

Unbound publishing, the Kickstarter for books, just had its very first success: It reached its target so that it could produce and then publish a new book by none other than Terry Jones, of Monty Python fame. Why is the tech and publishing world so excited about a single book from a lone, unheard-of, pint-sized publisher? Because the whole principle behind Unbound is to take the ancient, leather-bound business model of book publishing, rip out its crumbling pages, and replace it with crowd-funding, social interaction, and tandem digital publications and real hardback books. 

Here’s the core of Unbound’s idea: It proposes a new book on its website, and people choose to “donate” a small amount of money to it, in the hope that the book gets produced. The more money you donate, the more likely the target will be reached, and the bigger “treats” you get–right up to dinner with the author. When the target is reached, writing begins and people who’ve funded the book get special access to a back room at Unbound’s website, where they can interact in limited form with the author as the book emerges. At the end, an e-text is published and distributed, but you can also choose to get a high-quality hardback edition, printed on good paper with cloth binding for people who like their books to be weighty, well-designed, and smell like traditional books.

Unbound (tagline: “Books Are Now In Your Hands”) is most similar to Kickstarter, the crowd-sourced funding body that’s been responsible for all sorts of interesting projects from iPod Nano wristwatches to a swimming pool. “We get a little bit of gyp from purists who say we’re not opening the platform out as wide as Kickstarter,” Unbound’s cofounder John Mitchinson explained to Fast Company, “Which at the moment is definitely true.”

Unbound promotes carefully selected books–from well-known names–to see if the crowd is keen to buy a final product, and that’s definitely no Kickstarter. “We’re managing the back end in a way that Kickstarter doesn’t,” says Mitchinson. “They’re a pure fundraising platform.” In comparison, Unbound takes on more of a traditional publisher role once the funding target is raised. “We’re printing and distributing and finding the market for the books,” says Mitchinson. 

Read and learn more

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05/07/2011

The First Ultimate Online Book Site Has Arrived!


Bookish.com will be the ultimate site for all things literaryThree major publishers…Penquin, Hachette Book Group and Simon & Schuster…have committed to financing a one-stop book marketing and selling site.

The site will be called Bookish.com and will be operational late this summer.

“The site intends to provide information for all things literary: suggestions on what books to buy, reviews of books, excerpts from books and news about authors. Visitors will also be able to buy books directly from the site or from other retailers and write recommendations and reviews for other readers.”…Julie Bosman , NYTimes.

From Julie Bosman:

Publishers Make a Plan: A ‘One Stop’ Book Site

Publishers have spent a lot of time and money building their own company Web sites with fresh information on their books and authors. The trouble is, very few book buyers visit them.

In search of an alternative, three major publishers said on Friday that they would create a new venture, called Bookish.com, which is expected to make its debut late this summer. The site intends to provide information for all things literary: suggestions on what books to buy, reviews of books, excerpts from books and news about authors. Visitors will also be able to buy books directly from the site or from other retailers and write recommendations and reviews for other readers.

The publishers — Simon & Schuster, Penguin Group USA and Hachette Book Group — hope the site will become a catch-all destination for readers in the way that music lovers visit Pitchfork.com for reviews and information. The AOL Huffington Post Media Group will provide advertising sales support and steer traffic to the site through its digital properties.

“There’s a frustration with book consumers that there’s no one-stop shopping when it comes to information about books and authors,” said Carolyn Reidy, the president and chief executive of Simon & Schuster. “We need to try to recreate the discovery of new books that currently happens in the physical environment, but which we don’t believe is currently happening online.”

Read and learn more

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06/26/2009

More On Learning Book Marketing

Filed under: book marketing,book marketing blogs,book publicity — gator1965 @ 6:40 pm

Book marketing is just something a successful author HAS TO LEARN. I am a Work in Progress (WIP) in this area. I hope to be rudimentarily educated in this vital area sometime in the near future.

To that end, I will direct you to an informative blog, The Book Publicity Blog at http://yodiwan.wordpress.com/ I have discovered that is run by a professional publicist in a large publishing house: The publicist’s name is Jen and she blogs about book publicity/marketing.

Further, this blog lists a large array of links to other related blogs: Book Blogs, Bookstore Blogs, Future of Publishing Blogs, Literary Agent/Editor blogs, Marketing/PR blogs, Media Blogs, Publishing Blogs, Publishing House Blogs, etc.

WARNING: There is a vast quicksand of info on this blog and it’s links to keep you permanently occupied for a long time!

06/08/2009

On Publishing: John Austin Answers Jeanne Scott


Publishing a first book has never been easy is correct. Only points out the fact that the old publishing industry has never been properly manned to handle the talent workload. It’s just been an arbitrary decision by an agent or publisher…usually generated by uncontrollables such as his mood, hangovers…an eye catching lead-in that might catch his/her eye today but not tomorrow, etc,etc, ad infinitum. AND they say if you don’t dot an “i” or cross a stupid “t” OR your margins aren’t a certain friggin width…the idiots won’t even read the content that might be ingenious or wildly entertaining! These types need another job or a resetting of their priorities.

It’s nauseous and always been a stacked industry, deeply bent in favor of publishers and exploitive of the talent that made them the damn money in the first place!

AND THEN they want you (the author) to do the hard work for them by marketing your own book to make them the money…Who needs them? What good do they do in today’s atmosphere? The 30-40% split they allow you is a rip off! Should be the other way around and for what the publishers do they should be happy to get 30-40%…in fact, that’s probably too high!

In truth, publishing has never been an efficient industry and they probably deserve to die as they are now and just go away. Self-publish or get a “newer-age” publisher (that I feel has to emerge to fill the gap) that will allow the intellectual property creator to pocket the more rightful 60-70% of the earnings. Let’s get the dog wagging the tail again instead of the other way around…

05/27/2009

What is a Publicist?


The Small Publishers of North America has some excellent information on reviews and marketing books. The following is another partial extract from their fine site http://www.spannet.org/reviews.htm#Publicist :

A Publicist is a person who represents your book to the media. This can be very helpful to small publishers. Having a professional publicist makes the media take you more seriously than if you were representing yourself. Most publicists insist on a 6 month commitment for a set fee. Mailings, long distance and many other charges are billed separately. There are some publicists who charge a per-hour fee. They are hard to find.

Publicists send out press releases, press kits and sometimes books for reviews. They also work to get you and your book media coverage.

There are many publicists and range of costs. The following John Kremer link contains a comprehensive list of publicists and PR companies: http://www.bookmarket.com/101pr.htm

The Midwest Book Review site also is chock full of book marketing and media publicity info: http://www.midwestbookreview.com/bookbiz/pub_mkt.htm

A publicist can be costly, but can more than cover their fee PLUS make you thousands more if you get a good one. I will be researching publicists more for the next post. Do they have a professional organization/s ? Do they have a code of ethics ? And more on publicists’ costs and contracts…Stay tuned.

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