Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

02/14/2013

A Little About Book Discoverability


TOC Discusses E-Book Discoverability

Many today are whining about the difficulty (or impossibility – as they see it) of getting their individual e-book/s ‘discovered’ among the onslaught of  millions of other e-books.

“There’s a literal (excuse the pun) explosion of e-books being published out there since any Tom, Dick and Harry can publish now-a-days — AND they are all badly written as none of these so-called authors have any editing done!” So say the feeling-victimized, stuck-in-the-past, unadaptable, wannabe writers of the present — Now, not all of them fit into this category, thank God.

Book discoverability is not a one-dimensional process. It is more of a three-dimensional or multidimensional procedure. One doesn’t just put a book ad out and expect good results. Or jump on social media, for that matter, and push one’s book and expect the buyers to stampede to the book.

Before you can get results from such one-dimensional actions you must first invest some time and establish relationships, community and trust — build up a following of sorts.

Once you invest your time in others and establish your name, then you will discover there are numerous ways to get your e-work discovered, also 🙂

Insights on discoverability from the Tools of Change Publishing Conference, happening in New York, NY, February 12-14, 2013, reported by Erin L. Cox:

TOC 2013: Authors, What Are You Doing Worth Discovering?

Monday at Author (R)Evolution Day — presented by Tools of Change and Publishers Weekly — authors and speakers worked to answer the question, “how will a reader discover my book?”

Mark Lefebvre, Director of Self-Publishing and Author Relations at Kobo, retorted, “Ask not what discovery can do for you, ask what are you going to do that is worth discovering?” As with any discussion on discovery, the panel reminded the authors that they must first write a book that will attract and engage readers then they can create a marketing campaign that is tailored for their audience.

“The same kind of alchemy does not work for all writers and books,” said Elizabeth Keenan, Director of Publicity for Hudson Street Press and Plume. For authors like Anne Rice, who already reaches out to her followers several times a day, reaching out to them via Twitter and Facebook to promote her book was successful. That may not be true for everyone.

Lefebvre added that a million Twitter followers doesn’t necessarily translate into sales. Like with any curation or recommendation, there needs to be a level of personal trust in order to reach out to that audience.

Read and learn more

This Publishing/Writing Blog is available on Kindle :)))

Advertisements

01/19/2013

Publishers Outclassed by Digitally Savvy Writers


Digitally S a v v y Writer

Digitally S a v v y Writer

Actually, publishers have ALWAYS been outclassed by writers — who created the very content (product) that made publishers their living in the first place.

Publishers, as discussed in this post, are traditional publishers, OK? I make this clarification because today more and more writers are publishing their own works through self-publishing platforms — and are, therefore, publishers themselves 🙂

Michael Drew writes this nice piece in Huffpost, Books, that further details the slowness of TP’s to take full advantage of the new digital publishing landscape:

As E-Books Rise, Publishing Still Waivers

(John’s Note: I think Michael means publishing TP decision-making waivers – not the publishing business as a whole)

There’s probably no going back: e-books are going to be the dominant form for publishing pretty soon.

Consider that 23 percent of Americans now read e-books, up from 16 percent in 2011, and that the number of people reading “traditional” books is declining. On top of that, according to a study released by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, “the number of owners of either a tablet computer or e-book reading device such as a Kindle or Nook grew from 18 percent in late 2011 to 33 percent in late 2012.”

Okay — and tablets are likely even to overtake e-readers, as tablets grow smaller and more comfortable to hold and still more versatile than many models of e-reader.

And publishers may be embracing e-books more than they had in the past. They have, for one thing, the ability to change prices. As Dominique Raccah, president of Sourcebooks said in an piece on NPR, “The exciting thing about digital books is that we actually get to test and price differently,” Raccah says. “We can even price on a weekly basis.”

On top of that, too, publishers can release books more quickly. Although in traditional publishing, you still have to wait a good year for a book to appear on shelves once it’s been accepted for publication, with e-publishing, of course, those delays — brought about by distribution, printing schedules, etc. — no longer exist.

Read and learn more

This Writing/Publishing Blog is available on Kindle :)))

12/07/2011

Future Publishing and Book Selling – An Insight


The Flinch - The latest mini-book by Julien Smith to come out from The Domino Project.

I’ve been a follower and big fan of Joanna Penn for quite a while now … And never cease to learn from her personal book writing and publishing trials and successes, which she has published in the form of blogs … sort of like a reality show journaling her blossoming as a writer, author and teacher.

One outstanding thing about Joanna is her completely open mind and willingness to accept and try new concepts first and not accept prevalent prejudices and fears about them. She is like a sponge, absorbing new ideas and readily making them work.

The following post from her The Creative Penn blog is visionary, informative (full of incisive links) and indicative of her growing and unique abilities:

The Flinch, Newsjacking And Digital Publishing

The Flinch is the instinct to draw back and shrink away from pain or what is perceived to be dangerous, difficult or unpleasant.

  It’s also the title of the latest mini-book by Julien Smith to come out from The Domino Project. Right now, you can get it for free on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk(that’s the book cover shown left). It’s a short, challenging read with one main point.

Embrace the flinch regularly, push yourself out of your comfort zone and get on with doing the important things in life.

Stop avoiding pain, get some scars and achieve something worthwhile. If you need a kick in the pants, go download it and share it with others.

The Flinch is important for you because of the changes in the publishing industry.

I was at the #FutureBook conference earlier this week and although it was filled with positive, forward thinking book-lovers, you could also sense the fear and concern amongst those who still believe print is the only way forward. My article on what authors can learn from the conference will be on the Future of the Book blog soon, but today a few things happened that illustrated the changing times we’re in and I wanted to share them with you.

People buy from those they know, like and trust.

One of the buzzwords of the FutureBook conference was ‘discoverability’, how to help people find books they want to read in the mass of information online.

Well, people buy from people they know, like and trust which funnily enough, I learned from Julien Smith & Chris Brogan in their book Trust Agents. I downloaded The Flinch on the strength of my respect for Seth Godin as well as Chris & Julien. Yes, this book is free but I have also bought 90% of all books from Seth Godin’s Domino Project because I’m in his tribe. He doesn’t have to ‘sell’ me anything, he just has to tell me the books are available and I click to buy.

John Locke in his ‘How to sell 1 million ebooks’ said that authors need to have a list of fans who will buy their next book, in the same manner as Seth has done as well. Locke was the first indie author to reach 1 million Kindle sales so he knows what he’s talking about.

You can do this too.

Read and learn more

Get the Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue blog on your Kindle :)))

03/02/2011

Publishers: Learn to Better Attract and Retain Readers


Online publishers…especially writers who do blogs to expand their platform and brand and/or websites to sell their books, etc…definitely want to learn how to attract and keep many more readers AND retain them on their sites for longer periods per visit! 

I damn sure do. I have discovered that I’m a real dumbo when it comes to smart marketing…hell, I’m lacking even when it comes to dumb marketing.

Well, I have discovered an annual analysis of these very skill sets run by an outfit known as Lijit Networks and they have just released the results of their 2010 Publisher Tools Analysis.

The figures in this analysis will surprise and educate you.

More details from this PR Newswire release:

Lijit Networks Announces Results of 2010 Publisher Tools Analysis
Adoption of Social Media Tools Grows 80% as Online Publishers Learn to Better Attract and Retain Readers
 
Lijit Networks, Inc., the leader in custom site search and engagement tools for online publishers, today announced the results of its 2010 Publisher Tools Analysis. Within the Lijit Top 50, a list of the top 50 widgets and tools implemented on publisher websites, adoption of social media widgets grew 80% from 2009 to 2010. Widget adoption specifically related to Facebook and Twitter almost doubled, growing from 6.96% to 11.86% deployment. Social media widgets include tools used for social networking, micro-blogging, bookmarking, and photo sharing.As part of the research project, Lijit surveyed 735,834 websites to collect data on referring traffic and on-site widget deployment. Sites analyzed include all 15,000 sites in the Lijit Network as well as their extended network, which incorporates blogrolls and other linked sites. Of the sites surveyed, 84.8% have widgets installed. A widget is defined as, “any regularly-occurring functionality on a website powered by an external service, voluntarily installed by the site owner, and powered by Flash or Javascript.”

Referring traffic goes social

Three main categories of referring traffic data were analyzed: 1) search engine traffic, which comprised 44.42% of referring traffic; 2) organic traffic (defined by sites linking to each other), which comprised 35.89% of referring traffic; and 3) social media traffic, which comprised 19.68% of referring traffic. Of referring traffic from social media sources, 44% came from Facebook, 41% came from StumbleUpon, 6.7% came from Digg, 5.13% came from Twitter, and 2% came from Reddit. The data verifies that both social networking tools like Facebook and Twitter as well as social sharing tools such as StumbleUpon, Digg, and Reddit are being used to drive traffic to publisher websites.

“Online publishing has become a two-way street and those who are most successful have learned to use social media to build highly engaged, conversational communities of readers,” said Todd Vernon, CEO and founder of Lijit Networks. “Social media tools should not only be used to attract new readers but also to engage and retain them by allowing people to post comments, receive feedback, and share relevant information.”

Read and learn more

Remember to get this blog on your Kindle here

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: