Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

09/01/2011

Print’s Alive, but Publishing Still in Trouble? (Actually it’s NOT)


 

Is Publishing in Trouble or Not?

Apparently, a main theme coming out of the July 2011 Yale Publishing Conference was that ‘fear’ was at the center of all the chaos in the modern publishing world.

This is true … But, duhhhh, who didn’t already understand that! Of course it’s fear of change that is holding publishing back from being all it can be.

Fear of change and the unknown (or not understood) has always been a prevalent weakness for most Homo sapiens. 

Stefanie Botelho, writing for FOLIO Magazine, covered the conference:

If Print Isn’t Dead, Why is Publishing Still in Trouble?

Reasons why explored at Yale Publishing Conference.

At the Yale Publishing Conference, which took place last month in New Haven, CT, big names in magazine publishing were in attendance, both as students and teachers.

The session began with Richard Foster, senior faculty fellow at Yale School of Management and managing partner with the Millbrook Management Group, LLC. He philosophized about the term “creative destruction”, focusing its various implications in correlation to the publishing world.

Subsequent sessions led by Michael Clinton, president and marketing/publishing director of Hearst; president of Dwell Media Michela O’Connor Abrams; and Glamour editor-in-chief Cynthia Leive ran the gamut of print, digital and staffing challenges.

But the biggest theme, prevalent in how speakers addressed the crowd and the audience pressed the presenters for immediate solutions to admittedly complex problems (the transition to digital, etc.), was not listed in the printed program.

It was fear.

And that may be the largest issue the publishing industry is facing today: fear of the present, fear of the future, fear of the audience and, perhaps the most crippling, fear of change.

While not as easily palpable in the speakers (who each provided case study after case study of success within their companies), both lecturers and audience members rippled with it. Age jokes were dropped at a noticeable rate (O’Connor Abrams quipped she and only one other staffer are over 30) and tales of staff let go because of unwillingness to convert to the digital age (and assist in the bevy of products unrelated to actual print issues) were some of the most poignant of the day. The message was clear: get onboard or get out, because there are plenty of others to take your seat at the publishing table—many of them young enough to still be crashing with Mom and Dad.

Read and learn more

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07/12/2011

Tablet, E-Reader Addicts Also Want Print


Printed Books Still Desired

This is not surprising to me at all … I have posted many times RE the NON-demise of the printed word.

John’s Note: I tried to link to all past posts on ‘printed word’ or ‘print’ but WordPress is giving me trouble tonight! Just go to the “search this site button” at top of this page and enter ‘print’ for my past discussions. 

Oh, the printed word has definitely gone through changes … but, think about it … these changes were brought about by what? Why, the ‘printed’ word itself, of course … only in a different format (digital), that’s all.

A study on this very issue is presented in an article for FOLIO Magazine by Executive Editor Matt Kinsman:

Study Says Tablet, E-Reader Users Haven’t Given Up Print

Few magazine apps in the App Store don’t have at least one reviewer clamoring for a subscription package that bundles print and app, and now a new study from GfK MRI suggests that rather than abandoning old media, tablet and e-reader users might still be print’s best audience.

John’s Note: By the way GfK means ‘Growth from Knowledge’ and MRI means ‘Mediamark Research and Intelligence’

According to the study, tablet owners are 66 percent more likely than the average U.S. adult to be heavy users of printed versions of magazines, while e-reader owners are 23 percent more likely to be heavy print users.

The study also says men are more likely to own tablets while women are more likely to own e-readers (although I still dig my Kindle and I’ll arm-wrestle anyone at GfK MRI or Yudu who makes fun of me).

Read and learn more

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03/09/2010

Print Magazine Advertising to Grow in 2010 Despite Popularity of Online…


…For first time, however, spending on digital expected to outpace print.

It looks like all media types (especially print and digital) might be seeking (and finding) their own level RE advertising profits. I have mentioned in previous posts that when the newness of digital gadgets (Kindle, iPad, plus more to come) wears off a little and the dust settles…that print will still be standing, albeit not dominating.

One of my favorite go-to industry sources, FOLIO magazine’s reporter Jason Fell, reported this today:

Consumer and trade businesses this year are projected to spend approximately $119.6 billion on online and digital advertising strategies while shelling out $111.5 billion to print projects, research and advisory firm Outsell said Monday. Some good news for print: Ad spending on magazines is forecasted to be up 1.9 percent to $9.4 billion.

According to Outsell’s “Marketing and Ad Spending Study 2010: Total U.S. and B2B Advertising” report, overall spending on marketing and advertising will be $368 billion this year, an increase of 1.2 percent over 2009. Taking an overarching look at b-to-b and b-to-c businesses, the report projects spending, share and growth for five media types—online, events, print, TV/radio and PR/other.

Other findings from the report included that b-to-b advertisers see cross-media marketing as the most effective option with 78 percent combining three or more marketing methods; advertiser’s own Web sites generate the highest ROI for b-to-b; and social media has a firm place in marketing efforts—51 percent said Facebook is “extremely or somewhat” effective, 45 percent for LinkedIn, 35 percent for Twitter and 25 percent said the same for MySpace.

For the 2010 report, Outsell said it surveyed more than 1,000 U.S. advertisers in December 2009.

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