Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

03/23/2011

Tablet Computer World to Explode to 200 Million/Yr Sales by 2014!


More Tablet Computers Coming!

Good news for writers and publishers…but a vastly more crowded dance floor for the Apple iPad.

Why is this good news for writers and publishers?

Simply because of the HUGE rebirth in the popularity of reading that the tablets (as well as the singular e-readers such as Kindle) have generated.

AND, the resulting demand for constant new content.

PLUS, the ease and speed of access to books and all other written media COUPLED with the ever-increasing streamlining of the actual publishing process.  

I have some numbers tonight that will rock your socks! A study conducted by PRTM (PRTM = Pittiglio, Rabin, Todd & McGrath, by the way) claims that there are 104 tablets currently for sale or in development. With 17 million tablets sold in 2010, PRTM forecasted 200 million tablets to be sold annually for 2014!

How bout them figures? 

Stefanie Botelho writes these details in FOLIO magazine: 

Tablet Market Expands With New Competitors

Samsung and RIM will release tablets within the next four months.

RIM and Samsung have announced release dates for their versions of the tablet computer, with the RIM Blackberry Playbook on sale on April 19th and the new Wi-Fi version of the Samsung Galaxy tablet line launching June 8th.

Both companies are looking to grab a hold of a piece of the iPad-dominated tablet market. Apple’s second version of the iPad was unveiled in San Francisco on March 2nd, and shipped March 11th. Reportedly, Apple sold 14.8 million iPads in 2010.

The RIM PlayBook will feature a 7 inch screen, Flash compatible video and front and rear cameras. The 16GB version will be available for $499, a 32GB for $599 and a 64GB with a price tag of $699.

The PlayBook will have Wi-Fi capabilities, but they cannot utilize 3G without being connected through a Blackberry phone.

Read and learn more

Attention Kindle owners! Get this insightful blog right on your Kindle here

02/20/2011

Popularity of Digital Publishing Increases Piracy…Damn!


Damn is right. Is there no damn, damn, damn justice in this world?

As Ms. Digital becomes the homecoming queen of publishing, pirates are swarming for dates! 

While researching this topic I learned a few new terms and concepts (I must admit I’m a few notches below a newbie techie…not to mention my brain damage).

For instance::

A Torrent (or Bit Torrent) is a file distribution system used for transferring files (one or many) across a network of people. As you do…http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/B/BitTorrent.html

 Seeder. A seeder is a peer that has an entire copy of the torrent and offers it for upload. The more seeders there are, the better the chances of getting a higher download speed. If the seeder seeds the whole copy of the download, they should get faster downloads.

Leech. A leech is a term with two meanings. Usually it is used to refer a peer who has a negative effect on the swarm by having a very poor share ratio (downloading much more than they upload). Most leeches are users on asymmetric internet connections and do not leave their BitTorrent client open to seed the file after their download has completed. However, some leeches intentionally avoid uploading by using modified clients or excessively limiting their upload speed.                                                                                                                                                                     The often used second meaning of leech is synonymous with downloader (see above): used simply to describe a peer or any client that does not have 100% of the data. This alternative meaning was mainly introduced by most BitTorrent tracker sites.

A Torrent file of 2500 e-books is about 3.4 GB and can be downloaded in pretty much of a zip.

A single DVD movie and PC games are larger than the 2500 book file, usually b/t 4 to 7.5 GB’s.

So, at this time, it’s pretty damn easy (and fast) to steal others’ intellectual property!

You must read this revealing article by David Carnoy of CNET.com :

Kindle E-book Piracy Accelerates

Several months ago I set up a Google alert for my book, “Knife Music,” to keep abreast of anything anybody was saying–good or bad–about the thing. Over the months I’ve received news of the occasional blog post and tweets, but more recently I popped open an alert to learn that my book was being pirated–both as a separate file and part of two larger Torrents called 2,500 Retail Quality Ebooks (iPod, iPad, Nook, Sony Reader) and 2,500 Retail Quality Ebooks for Kindle (MOBI).

I had the strange reaction of being both dismayed and weirdly honored that someone had selected my book to strip free of its copy-protection (DRM) and include as part of a collection of “quality” e-books, many of which were from very good authors.

OK, so the use of the term “quality” was a reference to the formatting of the e-books and not the quality of the actual work, but for a moment I wasn’t too bothered. After all, if someone downloads 2500 books, what are the odds he or she is going to even bother looking at yours? I was probably only losing a few bucks, especially considering my e-book is currently priced at $3.99, which only leaves me with about 50 cents a book after the publisher, e-book seller, and agent, take their cuts. (John’s Note: I thought many e-retailers (like iPad) let the publishers keep 70% of sale!) Even if I missed out on selling 200 e-books, that’s a mere $100. No big deal, right?

Well, obviously, for big authors, this whole pirating thing presents a bigger problem–and a bigger loss. But that isn’t what dismayed me so much (sorry, but when you’re a little guy, you don’t care so much about how much the big guys are losing). Rather, what’s shocking, and what the publishers should be most concerned about, is the fact that a library of 2,500 books can be downloaded in a matter of hours. E-books are small files and 2,500 of them can be packed into a single download (Torrent) that’s only about 3.4GB. If you set the average price per book at a measly $2, the worth of said download would be $5,000. Bring it up to $4 a book and you’re at $10,000. (In fact, publishers charges much more for some of these books).

By comparison, a single DVD movie is usually larger than that, as well as many retail PC games, which tend to run in the 4GB to 7.5GB range. A “major” PSP title is about 1GB, sometimes a bit larger (yes, the PSP has been severely impacted by piracy).

I probably don’t need to point this out but I will. I have about 600 books in my paper book collection, which took me years to gather and prune during various moves. Digitally, that same collection could be downloaded in around 30 minutes and stored on a cheap 1GB thumb drive, which could then be copied in a matter of seconds and passed on to someone else.

A lot of people think moving away from paper is a good thing. Maybe it is. But what should also be alarming to publishers is that the number of people pirating books is growing along with the number of titles that are available for download. As I’ve written in the past, the rise of the iPad has spurred some of the pirating, but now the huge success of the Kindle is also leading to increased pirating. Yes some companies, such as Attributor, have done some studies about the issue, and seen increases. But for my evidence one only need glance at Pirate Bay and see what people are downloading and how many of them are doing it.

Read and learn more

 

A

01/31/2011

Amazon (Kindle store) Trumping Apple (iPad store) in eBook AND Print Sales


Amazon is still king of the book-sales world, both e-books AND printed books…and shows no sign of slowing down!

Amazon had a respectable market share of printed-book sales in the pre-Kindle era. In the post-Kindle era, sales of e-books went ballistic, as expected…but, strangely enough, Amazon held on to the same per centage of printed-book sales also, despite the supposed decline of print!

This article bt Jim Milliot of Publisher’s Weekly offers a clear (with graphics) analysis of the Amazon and Apple book sales market share… with explanations by Peter Hildick-Smith, president of the Codex Group, an industry study and analytical group:    

Amazon Ups Its Edge
Apple notwithstanding, trends point toward more market power for the e-tailer

Apple caused a stir last week when it announced that it sold 7.3 million iPads in the quarter ended December 25, bringing the number of devices it has sold since it released the iPad last April to nearly 15 million. But even as the iPad gains traction among book buyers, the clear winner in the first stages of the book industry’s digital transition is Amazon. A survey of 6,250 frequent book buyers conducted by the Codex Group in early November found more book buyers acquiring their e-books for the iPad from Amazon’s Kindle store rather than through Apple’s iBookstore, with the Kindle store accounting for 40% of e-book sales for the iPad and the iBookstore 29% (one factor limiting sales through the iBookstore is that Random House e-books are not directly available there because RH is not using the agency model). John’s Note: I have posted on this and other issues with Random House on my Writers Welcome Blog (WWB)  

While Apple has already sold over three times more iPads in just nine months than Amazon is estimated to have sold Kindles in three years, the sale of Kindles has had a huge impact in increasing Amazon’s “share of wallet” among book buyers, the Codex survey found. Before acquiring a Kindle, book buyers made about 14% of their unit purchases at Amazon, a figure that tripled to just over 37% after they bought a Kindle. “It’s the most amazing retail share growth strategy I’ve ever seen,” said Codex president Peter Hildick-Smith, who has also worked extensively in developing retail growth strategies for stores ranging from Wal-Mart to Harrods. The increase in market share came entirely from book buyers’ added purchase of e-books, with 28.1% of all unit buys of frequent book buyers coming from the Kindle store. But Hildick-Smith said it was equally impressive that Amazon was able to hang on to almost the same market share of book buyers’ print purchases even as buyers were substantially increasing their e-book purchases.

While e-book purchases do not appear to be cannibalizing print sales at Amazon, the Kindle store has to be taking sales away from somewhere, and Hildick-Smith believes it is from bricks-and-mortar stores. With the decline in the number of bookstores, publishers are losing not only the top sales channel but the most important showcase for their new titles. According to the Codex survey, bookstores remain, by far, the most important way book buyers learn about new books: 28% of all book buyers said they learned about the last book they bought by browsing in a bookstore or through a bookstore display, while 14.5% were discovered through a friend’s recommendation. Even among iPad users, 32% of device owners learned about their last book purchased through digital sources (an e-bookstore, author Web site, and other sources), but 23% discovered the book they bought at a bookstore.

Read and learn more

01/17/2011

Apple iPad Inks Deal with Murdoch Newspaper Despite Issues


In yesterday’s post,  Apple iPad Too Dictatorial to Publishers? , I discussed the two main issues RE why newspaper and mag publishers were avoiding Apple as their host digital seller. Those issues were an Apple-applied cut in desired publisher subscription rates and no subscriber data offered to publishers for follow-up sales, etc.

However, Rupert Murdoch and his News Corp.’s Daily digital newspaper have not been deterred. In fact, they have sunk quite an investment into an app for the iPad store.

See if you think Old Rupert made a good deal in the following details offered by Michael LearmonthAdAge.com, writing for Craines’s New York Business:

First sponsors emerge for iPad’s Daily

Macy’s, Verizon, Pepsi, Land Rover and Virgin sponsor project from News Corp. and Apple.

In the coming weeks, News Corp. is set to unveil one of its more audacious content bets in recent years: The Daily, a newspaper designed for the iPad and the generation of tablet devices it inspired.

Conceived by News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch, who negotiated directly with Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs, the publication breaks new ground in a couple of ways. First, it’s one of the biggest bets on traditional journalism in years on any platform—100 writers, editors and designers have been hired for the project—since Condé Nast sunk $100 million into Portfolio magazine.

Second, it will break the logjam that has bedeviled publishers attempting to move their subscription models to the iPad. Thus far, publishers have been reluctant to accept Apple’s terms: a 30% cut of subscription fees and no subscriber data. But The Daily will sell subscriptions through Apple’s App Store: 99¢ a day after a two-week trial, according to people briefed on the project, plus the ability to push new content to the app throughout the day. In a sign of how complex this is for Apple and for News Corp., tech blog AllThingsD reported the planned launch this week was delayed as the partners work out the kinks.

But one thing has fallen into place for The Daily: an impressive array of launch sponsors, including Macy’s, Verizon Wireless, Land Rover, Pepsi Max and Virgin America, according to people close to those deals. In addition to sponsoring the project, they’ll help The Daily get off the ground by offering incentives for their customers to download the app, such as frequent flyer miles from Virgin America.

Apple has an initial exclusive window for The Daily, but over time the newspaper will be adapted to a fast-proliferating category of iPad-like tablet devices running Google’s Android or operating systems from Microsoft, BlackBerry and Palm, now a division of HP. A good portion of the Murdoch clan, including Daily publisher Greg Clayman and newly appointed sales chief Christine Cook, were all at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this month to take in the new devices.

Read and learn more

12/05/2010

iPad Falling Behind in the “Savior of Publishing” Race – And Rightfully So!


Holy shitswowski! What’s going on with Apple and it’s stupid approach to putting up roadblocks to potential magazine and newspaper publishing clients in it’s iTunes Store RE handling of subscriptions?

Many popular magazine and newspaper iPad apps have already been developed to allow selling digital versions through Apple…AND the so-called Apple visionaries (idiots is more like it) are not allowing the personal information of subscribers to be accessed and managed by the content providers themselves!

Why? What is the purpose of this greedy hoarding? This should be a win-win situation for all parties to be more monetarily successful. The more direct use of personal demographic info will result in more targeted success for the newspaper and mag clients AND should result in more volume biz for the Apple iTunes Store.

Can someone with more insight than I explain this to me?

If Apple stays on this dumb course I think the popular mags and newspapers will take their business elsewhere. And where is that, you might ask? To the upcoming and surging Google and Android platforms, of course!

Also, Apple is demanding too damn much of a cut (30%) to allow the apps! Remember that great line from the New York gubernatorial campaign: The rent is too damn high!

Read these previous posts of mine for more background on this issue:

From this blog, Time Magazine is Unhappy with iPad Publishing

From Writers Thought for Today Blog, Publishers Becoming Wary of Apple

Here is a current little ditty on iPad News: Apple, Publishers Clash on Subscriptions from iPad.net :

The iPad has been looked upon as the “savior” of the publishing industry, but relations between Apple and major publishers have hit an impasse that may be insurmountable. If the two cannot agree on key issues, the publishers may be taking their business elsewhere.

We’ve been hearing rumors for months that iPad apps for numerous popular magazine and newspaper titles will become available for subscriptions at the iTunes Store. Now the reasons for the delay have surfaced. According to Peter Kafka at MediaMemo, Apple and the publishers are “still miles apart” when it comes to the terms for how to sell subscriptions.

Read and enjoy more

iPad Falling Behind in the "Savior of Publishing" Race – And Rightfully So!


Holy shitswowski! What’s going on with Apple and it’s stupid approach to putting up roadblocks to potential magazine and newspaper publishing clients in it’s iTunes Store RE handling of subscriptions?

Many popular magazine and newspaper iPad apps have already been developed to allow selling digital versions through Apple…AND the so-called Apple visionaries (idiots is more like it) are not allowing the personal information of subscribers to be accessed and managed by the content providers themselves!

Why? What is the purpose of this greedy hoarding? This should be a win-win situation for all parties to be more monetarily successful. The more direct use of personal demographic info will result in more targeted success for the newspaper and mag clients AND should result in more volume biz for the Apple iTunes Store.

Can someone with more insight than I explain this to me?

If Apple stays on this dumb course I think the popular mags and newspapers will take their business elsewhere. And where is that, you might ask? To the upcoming and surging Google and Android platforms, of course!

Also, Apple is demanding too damn much of a cut (30%) to allow the apps! Remember that great line from the New York gubernatorial campaign: The rent is too damn high!

Read these previous posts of mine for more background on this issue:

From this blog, Time Magazine is Unhappy with iPad Publishing

From Writers Thought for Today Blog, Publishers Becoming Wary of Apple

Here is a current little ditty on iPad News: Apple, Publishers Clash on Subscriptions from iPad.net :

The iPad has been looked upon as the “savior” of the publishing industry, but relations between Apple and major publishers have hit an impasse that may be insurmountable. If the two cannot agree on key issues, the publishers may be taking their business elsewhere.

We’ve been hearing rumors for months that iPad apps for numerous popular magazine and newspaper titles will become available for subscriptions at the iTunes Store. Now the reasons for the delay have surfaced. According to Peter Kafka at MediaMemo, Apple and the publishers are “still miles apart” when it comes to the terms for how to sell subscriptions.

Read and enjoy more

11/29/2010

Publishing Crossroads – The Main Intersection


With the advent of mobile devices such as the iPad and iPhone, newspapers and magazines see a hitherto nonexistent opportunity for generating paid subscription digital versions as the new mobiles (and they WILL be proliferating like rabbits!) will be hungry for great, meaningful and pertinent content.
The publishing crossroads is a balancing act between the younger generation, used to digital media and expecting instant info, and the older generation, still loyal to print…and how to make both profitable while complimenting each other!

Tony Glover writes this for The National:

Publishers put future at fingertips with iPad papers

Business moguls such as Rupert Murdoch and Sir Richard Branson are developing newspapers and magazines that can be viewed only online on the Apple iPad. This move to entirely digital newspaper publishing could herald a global expansion of online publishing in regions such as the Middle East, which have a growing thirst for local content.

Mr Murdoch, the chairman of News Corp, is reported to be planning a daily digital iNewspaper to launch on the iPad, which it is understood will be called The Daily. He is believed to have a staff of 100 in place in New York to run the newspaper. The absence of printing costs means The Daily is expected to retail at only 99 cents a week. The project follows Mr Murdoch’s move to make the digital versions of the UK’s The Times and The Sunday Times pay-only websites.

But The Daily has already attracted criticism from rivals who say that a staff of 100 is too small to produce a credible daily newspaper. However, some of Mr Murdoch’s rivals, such as Sir Richard, are trying to leapfrog News Corp by publishing offerings of their own, with Virgin expected to unveil an iPad magazine in New York this week.

Newspaper publishers are becoming convinced that iNewspapers on devices such as the iPad will gradually come to replace print. Many of the world’s leading publications are also developing versions of their publications specifically for the iPad. The Economist, for example, has an iPad application and, like other digital publishers, considers these new internet devices as ideal for winning market share in regions such as the Middle East, where print distribution can be expensive.

Sanjay Gohil, the iPad production editor at the Financial Times, says: “The iPad is a lot more nimble and quick than traditional PCs and allows you to download electronic newspapers and read them later, when you are without an internet connection.”

He says the iPad allows online newspapers to become multimedia products, offering video and audio clips in addition to print and stills photography.

Read and learn more

11/28/2010

Market Intelligence for the Professional Publishing Industry


In the digital publishing age a balance needs to be created between the customers’ desire for immediate accessability at any time to enriched text (enhanced with audio, video, three-dimensional objects, full text searching, note taking, etc) and “…publishers’ needs for financial self-sustainability.”

We are at the age where researchers can access works in the form of e-books that are accessable at any time and any place and never go out of print!

This is heavy neatness to the extreme. Publishing and content are moving at warp speed!

Simba Information, publishing and media intelligence and analysis, has outlined a report that exemplifies the ongoing depth of analysis required in this transition time in the publishing industry:

Professional Publishing in the Digital Age: E-Books in Libraries

Electronic books offer creative possibilities for expanding access as well as changing learning behavior and academic research. Content can always be accessible, regardless of time or place, to be read on PCs or on portable book readers. Books need never go out of print, and new editions can be easily created. One can carry several titles at once on a portable reader and, over time, build a personal library.

Professional Publishing in the Digital Age: E-Books in Libraries examines how libraries are turning to e-books to strike a balance between patrons’ demands for openness and convenience and publishers’ needs for financial self-sustainability.

Features such as full text searching, changeable font size, mark-up, citation creation, and note taking are enhancing usability. Print text can be integrated with multi-dimensional objects, sound, and film to create a whole new kind of monographic work.

The report examines questions such as:

– What happens to e-book usage when barriers to inconvenience are removed?
– When patrons can have easy access to scholarly e-books, what does their usage look like and what does this predict   for the future of these types of resources?
– Are these innovative models more or less fiscally sound than their traditional counterparts?
– What will make e-books a viable part of academic library collections?
– What features, rights, business models, hardware and software standards are needed to meet the goals of large academic library systems to support open scholarly exchange?

 Read and learn more

08/08/2010

Who’s Winning the E-book War–Amazon or Apple?

Filed under: Amazon,Apple,e-books war,iPad,Kindle — gator1965 @ 8:46 am

We all know that Apple’s iPad sold 3.3 million units since it’s introduction in April. The purposefully cloudy reporting of Amazon’s earning figures make their Kindle sales harder to discern (we don’t want our competition to know type thing)…Hummmm, the whole Kindle reporting method seems cloudy to me, as well as Amazon’s motives and agenda. But, their single-function Kindle is still selling like hotcakes and is on back-order for now…I just can’t help but wonder, though, if it’s days aren’t numbered against the multi-functional iPads and future clones.

Randall Stross writes this for the New York Times:

THE Kindle from Amazon.com is designed to let us do one thing very well: read. To survive, it must excel at this, not only by jostling to stay a nose ahead of other e-readers, but also by maintaining an enormous lead over the Apple iPad and its coming competitors. The multipurpose iPad can do thousands of things very well; used for reading book-length texts, it doesn’t excel, but it’s passable.

Last month, Amazon introduced a pair of third-generation machines — smaller, lighter and with crisper text. One has a new, lower entry price of $139. “I predict there will be a 10th-generation and a 20th-generation Kindle,” said Jeffrey P. Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive. If that sounds a tad defensive, it’s probably because of the instant success of the multipurpose iPad: 3.3 million units sold since its introduction in April.

We know how many iPads were sold because Apple is straightforward about reporting the unit sales of all of its products. Amazon is a different story. We don’t know the size of Amazon’s Kindle business because the company is averse to disclosing details of its operations. When it reports its financial results, the company that sells just about anything that can be put in a box or sent electronically divides its businesses into just three categories: “media,” which lumps books, music and videos into one indistinguishable agglomeration; “electronics and other general merchandise,” an even larger, indistinguishable agglomeration; and “other.”

Read more http://alturl.com/q8kmb

07/25/2010

E-books Sales Up – Print Books Maintaining

Filed under: Amazon,Apple,e-books,iPad,Kindle sales,print books — gator1965 @ 2:50 pm

Another view that puts print books in proper perspective…They are still a strong force.

Bob Hoover , of the Pittsburg Post-Gazette, writes this intuitive piece that points out some figures that are sometimes ignored or forgotten:
Amazon, the online retailer, has been selling its Kindle digital book reader for nearly three years now, one of a handful of these electronic devices, including the recent Apple iPad that combines a bunch of “applications” that the other digital readers lack.

Despite the makers’ suggestions that the device will make the old-fashioned print book extinct, it seems clear, for some time to come, at least, that these “appliances” are alternatives to books, not replacements.

My two-week experience with a Kindle last year convinced me that it’s fine for reading straightforward narrative fiction and nonfiction while traveling, but it’s a cold, impersonal experience for a “dinosaur” like myself, not raised on computer screens.

And, it’s the screen itself that limits the eyes from roaming around unlike a standard book with its two-page view, as though you are inhabiting the story rather than getting it in restricted chunks.

No matter. E-book readers are selling well. Apple said last week it had sold 3.27 million iPads since April. Amazon said Kindle sales have tripled. Sony chimed in as well, claiming to have scored 10 million book sales at its online download store.

What boosted those sales was price cuts. Barnes & Noble sells a Nook model for $149; Amazon dropped the Kindle from $259 to $189 recently.

Amazon raised the level of its aggressive marketing strategy last week when it announced that e-book sales have surpassed print book totals on its website.

“Over the past month, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 180 Kindle books,” the company said.

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO, called the event “the tipping point” for digital books, meaning his company’s digital-book department and its Kindle.

Perhaps we should place that claim into perspective.

As Michael Cader of the trade observer Publishers Lunch pointed out, sales of print books last year were 205 million, a number that must reduce digital book numbers to insignificance at this point — if we had those figures, but Amazon won’t provide specific numbers, either for book or Kindle sales.

Read more http://alturl.com/dsbfw

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: