Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

03/11/2013

Insulting Intrigue From Atlantic Magazine’s Digital Side


A bad offer or what?

A little juicy publishing intrigue tonight — Apparently, the Atlantic Magazine (which I’ve always respected up until now) is soliciting quality work from real professionals and offering insulting pay — ZERO, to be exact!

Now, there will be some newbie writers who might be tempted to jump at the chance for great exposure with Atlantic, but, DON”T GIVE YOUR WORK AWAY to a prestigious, for-profit entity that will just make more money off your work. Newbies should at least ask for crumb wages.

Interesting story, though. I had to laugh a little when I read the following exchange between freelance journalist, Nate Thayer and Olga Khazan, the Global Editor of the Atlantic Magazine.

From Nate Thayer’s blog:

 

A Day in the Life of a Freelance Journalist—2013

Here is an exchange between the Global Editor of the Atlantic Magazine and myself this afternoon attempting to solicit my professional services for an article they sought to publish after reading my story “25 Years of Slam Dunk Diplomacy: Rodman trip comes after 25 years of basketball diplomacy between U.S. and North Korea”   here http://www.nknews.org/2013/03/slam-dunk-diplomacy/ at NKNews.org

From the Atlantic Magazine:

On Mar 4, 2013 3:27 PM, “olga khazan” <okhazan@theatlantic.com> wrote:

Hi there — I’m the global editor for the Atlantic, and I’m trying to reach Nate Thayer to see if he’d be interested in repurposing his recent basketball diplomacy post on our site.

Could someone connect me with him, please?

thanks,
Olga Khazan
okhazan@theatlantic.com

 From the head of NK News, who originally published the piece this morning:

Hi that piece is copy right to NK News, so please engage us mutually.
Thanks, tad

From the Atlantic:

Sure. Thanks Nate and TadI was just wondering if you’d be interested in adapting a version of that for the Atlantic. Let me know if you’d be interested.

thanks,

Olga

From me:

Hi Olga:

Give me a shout at 443 205 9162 in D.C. and I’d be delighted to see whether we can work something out.

Best,

Nate Thayer

From the Atlantic:

Sure, I’ll call you in a few minutes.

After a brief phone call where no specifics were really discussed, and she requested I email her:

Hi Olga: What did you have in mind for length, storyline, deadline, and fees for the basketball  diplomacy piece. Or any other specifics. I think we can work something out, but I want to make sure I have the time to do it properly to meet your deadline, so give me a shout back when you have the earliest chance.

best,

Nate Thayer

From the Atlantic:

Thanks for responding. Maybe by the end of the week? 1,200 words? We unfortunately can’t pay you for it, but we do reach 13 million readers a month. I understand if that’s not a workable arrangement for you, I just wanted to see if you were interested.

Thanks so much again for your time. A great piece!

From me:

Thanks Olga:

I am a professional journalist who has made my living by writing for 25 years and am not in the habit of giving my services for free to for profit media outlets so they can make money by using my work and efforts by removing my ability to pay my bills and feed my children. I know several people who write for the Atlantic who of course get paid. I appreciate your interest, but, while I respect the Atlantic, and have several friends who write for it, I have bills to pay and cannot expect to do so by giving my work away for free to a for profit company so they can make money off of my efforts. 1200 words by the end of the week would be fine, and I can assure you it would be well received, but not for free. Frankly, I will refrain from being insulted and am perplexed how one can expect to try to retain quality professional services without compensating for them. Let me know if you have perhaps mispoken.

best,

Nate

 

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02/20/2013

Inside Intrigue Re Readers Digest’s 2nd Bankruptcy Filing


Did you realize that Readers Digest reaches more $100,000 + income households than Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week and Inc. COMBINED ? Well, it does — according to Mediamark Research and Intelligence (also known as Growth from Knowledge – Mediamark Research and Intelligence [GfK MRI]).

RD is a veritable empire — albeit, one in stormy straits.

I grew up devouring Readers Digest and dearly love(d) it for the enlightening, timely and clearly written articles/stories AND the superb humor. Apparently, this venerable piece of consumer literature, enjoyed around the world in numerous languages, has encountered some rough waters — due, most probably, to bad management decisions in what had become an unwieldy, global empire during an explosively changing publishing landscape (in this writer’s humble opinion).

Let’s get into some key numbers and behind-the-scenes happenings with Michael Rondon writing for FOLIO magazine:

Behind RDA’s Chapter 11 Filing

RDA considered a sale, major creditors include several former employees.

RDA Holding has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time in four years.

The move to convert $465 million in debt to equity comes after the company considered a “wide range of alternatives” however, according to a statement from Robert Guth, president and CEO of RDA.

Guth was unavailable for comment in the lead-up to first-day motions with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, but some in the industry believe a sale of at least part of the company had been one of the “alternatives” explored.

“I do believe that RDA was approached by buyers and in conversations,” says Reed Phillips, CEO and managing partner of DeSilva + Phillips, an M&A advisory firm specializing in media properties.

Selling off titles wouldn’t be a first for the company, who parted with Every Day with Rachel Ray in October of 2011 and AllRecipies.com in January of 2012–both purchased by Meredith. Those are among the more publicized changes since Guth took over about a month before the Rachel Ray deal, but they’re part of an on-going evolution, he says.

“The complex transformation that we began 18 months ago under the leadership of a new senior management team has resulted in a more streamlined, more focused, and more profitable business,” Guth says in the statement.

Since then, business has been mixed though. Year-over-year operating losses decreased in first three quarters of 2012, while revenues took big hits. Yearly ad pages were up on two of its three biggest titles, Reader’s Digest and Family Handyman, but down on another staple, Taste of Home, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. Circulation has remained relatively steady over that time for each, per Alliance for Audited Media numbers.

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10/18/2012

Most Magazines to Begin Going Digital-Only by the End of the Decade


Newsweek – Going Digital-Only AND Global

At least that is what publishing industry ‘watchers’ predict.

One early indicator of this transformation: Newsweek magazine is going digital-only at the end of this year and be renamed Newsweek Global. (I still don’t think print mags will disappear completely – they’ve had too much of a renewed growth and popularity – due, incidentally, to digital growth).

But, it’s the ‘going global’ thing with Newsweek — and how they’ve set it up — that I think is interesting.

TJ Raphael reports this in FOLIO magazine:

Newsweek To Cease Print Publication in 2013

Rebranded in a digital-only format called Newsweek Global.

Earlier this week at the American Magazine Conference, industry watchers speculated that most magazines will begin going digital-only by the end of the decade—that prediction seems to be coming to fruition sooner than expected, starting with today’s announcement that Newsweekmagazine will cease its print publication by the end of 2012.

After 80 years in print, the magazine will transition to an all-digital format, renaming itself Newsweek Global, and will become a single, worldwide edition targeted for a mobile audience. Newsweek has an Asian edition; a Business Plus edition; an edition for Latin America; Europe, the Middle East and Africa in addition to its U.S. publication, all of which will be consolidated into Newsweek Global.

A statement from the Newsweek/Daily Beast Company, signed by editor-in-chief Tina Brown and CEO Baba Shetty, says that Newsweek Global will be supported by paid subscription and will be available through e-readers for both tablet and the Web, with select content available on The Daily Beast.

“Regrettably we anticipate staff reductions and the streamlining of our editorial and business operations both here in the United States and internationally,” says an internal memo posted on the company’s Tumblr page. “More details on the new organizational structure will be shared individually in the coming weeks and months.”

According to the most recent Fas-Fax from the Audit Bureau of Circulations for the period ending June 30, 2012, Newsweek saw a 9.7 percent year-over-year drop in the number of single copies sold at retail, with total paid, verified and analyzed non-paid circulation dropping by 0.2 percent. In the last three years, its total paid and verified circulation has gone from 2,646,613 to 1,527,157, with single copies going from 64,866 to 42,065 during the same period. Ad pages, however, have been up by 2.5 percent year-to-date, according to Min Box Score numbers.

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06/23/2012

Print vs Digital magazine Format – Intriguing Decision


SmartMoney Mag – Going Digital Only ?

An intriguing decision, indeed, and this post looks into insiders’ analytical thinking and number crunching.

This post also peeks inside who’s who (and was) in the News Corp, Dow Jones, Wall Street Journal, Smart Money and Market Watch  hierarchy.

Smart Money, one of the largest monthly personal-finance magazines with a circulation of 813,730 last year, is going to cut its print version beginning in October, 2012, and expand its digital platform.

Why ? Well, the thinking, reasoning and data supporting that decision is explored by John Jannarone And WilliamLaunder in the Wall Street Journal:

SmartMoney Will Move to Web-Only Magazine 

Dow Jones & Co. said Thursday it will stop publishing the print version of SmartMoney, although it will expand the personal-finance magazine’s digital platform.

Dow Jones, a unit of News Corp., which also publishes The Wall Street
Journal, said it would add six new positions to SmartMoney.com’s editorial staff but eliminate 25 jobs related to the print edition production. The last issue of the monthly magazine will be September’s, available on Aug. 14.

“It’s clear that the volatility of markets and asset classes has increased the need for rapid delivery of personal finance intelligence, so we will be expanding our team and presence on the Web,” said Robert Thomson, editor in chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal.

SmartMoney is among the largest monthly personal-finance magazines, with a circulation of 813,730 last year, compared with 818,526 in 2007, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. Rival magazine Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has a circulation of about 628,000 and Money has roughly 1.9 million readers, the ABC says. All three magazines have struggled to increase circulation in recent years.

The decision to halt publication of SmartMoney is one of the first major changes at Dow Jones since the arrival in February of Lex Fenwick as chief executive. In 2010, Dow Jones acquired from Hearst Corp. the 50% interest in SmartMoney it didn’t already own. Hearst and Dow Jones jointly launched SmartMoney in 1992.

More changes appear to be in store at Dow Jones. In an internal memo to employees Thursday, Mr. Thomson said there are other “just-approved expansion plans” for The Wall Street Journal but didn’t provide any specifics. Earlier this week, Dow Jones announced a reorganization of management and the resignation of Todd Larsen from his role as president.

Dow Jones said all content and tools from SmartMoney.com will become available on a new co-branded personal finance section on its MarketWatch.com financial-information site . In May, MarketWatch.com had 5.3 million unique visitors, up 50% from the same month of 2011. SmartMoney.com’s unique visitor count has increased 14% over the same period to 1.6 million people.

Write to John Jannarone at john.jannarone@wsj.com and William Launder at william.launder@dowjones.com

 

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06/12/2012

How Targeted Acquisitions are Changing the Magazine Publishing Model


Targeted Acquisitions Changing Publishing Model

Giant publishers such as Hearst and Meredith are foregoing expansion by building in-house tangential departments (such as digital, mobile and marketing services) from the ground up and are, instead, target purchasing already established peripheral companies with the needed expertise.

They are doing so to play catch up with a marketplace that is moving faster than organic growth can keep pace with.

Who is buying who and what, when, and for what purpose and at what cost, and what’s exactly behind the deals is detailed by Bill Mickey, Editor of FOLIO magazine:

The Acquired

How big publishers like Meredith and Hearst are expanding operations, hedging against print advertising and transforming the traditional publishing model through targeted acquisitions.

Acquisitions allow companies to make rapid changes to their corporate structure and are often a way to play catch-up with a marketplace that’s moving faster than organic growth can keep up. The call for diversification has been going on quite a while now and it’s no big secret that print advertising, by itself, is incapable of the scale publishers need to survive. Accordingly, publishers have been acquiring companies with surgical precision that allow them to quickly enter a market that’s tangential to magazine publishing, but far enough outside their wheelhouse to be considered nontraditional—digital, mobile, marketing services, for example. And as these acquisitions are being made, the model of magazine publishing itself is being changed. And we wanted to look at how these deals not only change the buyer, but the seller too, and what this means for an industry that once only had one thing to do: Print magazines.

Two companies have historically been singled out for making key acquisitions that have, along with continuing to build out and expand their core media expertise, quickly given them significant market share in marketing spending outside of print—Meredith and Hearst. Here, we dive into their key acquisitions to see how the companies have changed as a result, the value that’s being created, and how the companies they acquired have also changed.

The Shift From Offline to Online

Nothing has inspired the necessity to chase nontraditional deals than the rapid shift of marketing dollars from print to digital channels. And now, even digital has fractured into social, mobile and search marketing spending, to name a few. Meredith was one publisher that recognized this relatively early and in the last 5 years has spent roughly $110 million on six companies to form its Meredith Xcelerated Marketing Group (MXM).

The group is kind of like an in-house advertising and marketing agency that allows Meredith to offer marketing services way beyond what its core media brands can offer by themselves. Yet having those media brands in close proximity to these new services allows for tremendous leverage and scale for the acquired companies as well.

Meredith had been offering “custom publishing” services to the tune of $75 million in annual revenue for 35 years before MXM, but the market was quickly changing in ways that print-centered custom solutions could no longer support. It was time to start buying, and fast.

“It became clear to us that the marketing dollars would start moving from offline to online,” says John Zieser, chief development officer and general counsel for Meredith Corporation. “We knew we needed these competencies and it was better to acquire them for a few key reasons: We needed them, the market was moving quickly, we had to get to market. In our minds it was better to buy businesses that had a track record of serving clients.”

Bootstrapping Is Too Slow

With the market changing so quickly and with huge accounts in the balance, Zieser and the rest of the executive team weighed the risks of a bootstrapping, entrepreneurial approach versus buying established expertise with an existing track record. “It’s really about how do you focus on delivering these competencies to our clients in a top-quality way?” he says. “If you find the right target, that’s a much more intelligent approach in our world, which is moving quickly. To me, as a corporate executive, it’s a lot less risky approach than trying to start something from scratch and putting it front of a Nestlé or Kraft and hoping it all works.”


Impacting the Traditional Model

While MXM operates as its own group, now making about $300 million in annual revenues (a far cry from Meredith’s custom publishing days), it has also had an impact on Meredith’s National Media group as well. The various companies that make up MXM now have a deep well of mass media-branded content to draw from and support their marketing services, and Meredith’s brands benefit from having a cutting-edge agency within arm’s reach. “Having cutting-edge marketing services is very useful—we often have National Media people sit in with pitches. We’ve also developed a profile of a company that is much more attractive to our clients than if we were to just stay in our traditional publishing role, there’s a halo effect as a result of these development activities,” says Zieser.

A unit within the National Media group, called Meredith 360, made up of executives attached to the big, national clients, also meets regularly with MXM and keeps them apprised on the strategic needs of the larger accounts. “It’s a useful pipeline to understand what our clients are looking for outside of traditional advertising,” adds Zieser.

Now, integrated marketing programs can run $1 million to $2 million per discipline (mobile, digital, social, etc.), but can run upwards of $10 million for a 12-month program across them all, some much higher.

Treading Lightly

In forming MXM, Meredith had a tight line to walk as each company was gradually integrated into the group and the company as a whole. In all cases, Meredith acquired entrepreneurial-run operations that were on the verge of stepping up to the next level and needed a bigger partner to make that happen. The owners didn’t want to totally liquidate and exit, and most of the deals were built on three-year earn-out models to keep the primary shareholders motivated and incentivized.

Nevertheless, the acquired brands had standalone value, and integrating them into the mothership too quickly could dilute that value. “We were very careful. These businesses are people businesses that have intellectual property—it’s human capital and expertise in that particular discipline. We were very careful about not integrating those businesses too quickly and not jeopardizing what made them special. But we were integrated from a revenue perspective very quickly,” says Zieser.

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05/15/2012

Magazine Publishing: E-Media Revenue is Slow (Let’s Peek Inside the Numbers)


Magazine Revenue Sources

I post news on the entire publishing industry and remind readers occasionally of just what the whole publishing industry consists of 🙂 

Wikipedia gives about the best concise definition of Publishing:

‘Publishing includes the stages of the development, acquisition, copyediting, graphic design, production – printing (and its electronic equivalents), and marketing and distribution of newspapers, magazines, books, literary works, musical works, software and other works dealing with information, including the electronic media.’

Bill Mickey, Editor of Folio magazine (the magazine for magazine management) , discusses the results of Folio’s 2012 B2B CEO survey and says  “Hurry Up with That E-Media Revenue.”

Apparently, the survey reflected an industry still heavily dominated by print. Nothing wrong with that, but it worries the execs that the other platforms, such as digital, are not increasing their shares fast enough.

In other words, the ad revenue from the new tech media is not growing fast enough … at least, not as expected.

Mickey says their 2009 B2B CEO survey reflected e-media representing 12% of revenues for companies making < $5 million, and 13% for 2010. And in 2011, 13% again. For companies making > than $5 million, e-media accounted for 13% in 2009; 19% in 2010 and 17% in 2011. Not a very fast growth.

The one good thing is that print did remain steady during this same period.

As the focus continues on digital, and as mobile platforms mature, more dramatic upticks are expected in the other key revenue categories next year.

Believe me, the magazine publishing biz is doing quite well today compared to a few years ago!

Now, for some great analytical charts and graphs detailing more inside numbers of Folio’s 2012 B2B CEO survey jump here.

11/07/2011

‘The Week Magazine’ Proves Print Power Still Exists


Print Magazine Success!

When most print magazines have been devoting more and more effort to digital operations to save their very skins … The Week magazine has been growing print subscriptions and advertising sales like it was the glory days of the 1960’s. 

How are they doing this, you ask? 

I asked too … and found this incisive article by Matt Kinsman, Executive Editor of FOLIO magazine

Print Power

How The Week continues to grow print revenue (and profits) in a dotcom world.

Mobile content and community brands dominated the media category of the 2011 Inc. 5000, which recognizes the 5,000 fastest-growing privately-held companies in the U.S. (The number one company in the media category: GoLive! Mobile, which “creates and packages content, including videos, games, and social media, for consumers to access on their mobile phones”, as well as offers consulting services to companies that want to create their own mobile content.)

But “traditional” publishers made the list as well, including two Felix Dennis-owned publications: Mental Floss, ranked #50 in the media category with three-year revenue growth of 52 percent to $3.1 million in 2010, and The Week at #51 in media with three-year growth of 49 percent to $38.4 million in 2010. Unlike many of the other publishers on the list, The Week continues to flourish as a print enterprise.

Here, president Steve Kotok talks to FOLIO: about how The Week continues to boost print revenue and profit, why readers are the brand’s best way of gaining new subscribers and why The Week is waiting until 2012 to finally jump into the app race.

FOLIO: The Week recently made the Inc. 5000 as one of fastest growing media brands. Where is the growth coming from?

Steve Kotok: I would say the growth is coming equally from subscription and advertising. The subscription growth is coming from our ability to raise price, that’s the biggest thing. According to ABC, our price is up 40 percent, and as measured by us as net-net it’s doubled.

On the ad side, it’s going from selling print ad pages to engaging with these larger brands. The number of ad packages we’ve sold at $500,00 or more since 2008 went from one to three to 10, this year it should be 15. The vast majority are combining print, digital, and events. We wouldn’t say, ‘Oh, it’s coming from print ads or digital ads.’ It’s coming from our ability to offer larger packages to the advertising brands and serve them if they want to make a splash in D.C., to serve them digitally, to serve them in multiple ways.

There is stuff we put in buckets for accounting, but when really looking at our biggest sales, we may say $600,000 of this goes to print, $400,000 goes to digital, and $50,000 goes to an event fee. We wouldn’t be able to sell any of it without the other.

FOLIO: Are packages coming from existing advertisers or new advertisers?

Kotok: It’s a combination. Every year you start new, some are existing advertisers, a lot of them are new…it’s definitely breaking a lot of new business but that’s not really a distinguishing factor. Every year we make our best shot at them.

FOLIO: Please talk about current revenue ratios (print versus digital versus other channels). What is it today and how has that changed in recent years? What does it need to be going forward?

Kotok:
Subscriptions and print advertising are more or less equal with Web ads being 15 to 18 percent of the revenue generated by print ads. However, print and Web ads combined exceed subscription revenue.

FOLIO: Do you see that changing going forward?

Kotok: I don’t now if we will see a huge change. A few years ago we may have thought that ads were going to grow faster than subscriptions but our ability to grow subscription revenue and keep it growing has surprised us. I don’t think we’ll start doing more digital advertising than print advertising.

We’re going on the Kindle, Nook and iPad in January and that’s all circulation revenue. I don’t see the mix radically changing, although we still see our print subscriptions and our print ads growing. Web ads are growing faster but at 15 percent of print revenue, it’s not a massive shift—we may go 80/20, 75/25, print to digital in the future. We have a good business. We’re aware of the trends. Even before digital, there were trends to follow. We’re not embarrassed of print.

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06/30/2011

The State of Magazine Publishing in 2011


Plum Hamptons magazine

What does the periodical publishing picture look like in the current economy thus far in 2011? Not too damn bad! (I have posted on the magazine comeback in previous posts). There have been 138 new launches versus 74 folds in 2011 according to online periodical database MediaFinder.

Most old, favorite mags were pulled from the jaws of extinction by their scramble to and gained expertise in digital production … including complex content and multi-media platforms … AND, believe it or not, the rapid popularity in the mags new online presentations has led to a rebirth of the print issues as well, including ad revenues … At least that’s my understanding of the smoke signals.

This from FOLIO Magazine by Stefanie Botelho:

As the publishing industry continues to recover from the economic recession, 138 magazines launched in the first half of 2011, according to online periodical database MediaFinder.

In the first half of 2010, only 90 new titles came to fruition.

The food and regional interest sectors boast the most launches, category-wise, in the first half of 2011, with new titles like Plum Hamptons hitting the market.

Some good news for b-to-b: 34 new titles launched in the first half, including Progressive Cattleman and Converting Quarterly, compared to 13 titles that folded, including Industrial Wastewater and Texas Construction.

Seventy-four titles closed in the top half of 2011, down from 86 closures in the same period in 2010. Although tied with the food sector for the most number of launches, the regional interest segment also saw the most magazine closures, including the closure of regional “luxe” 944 Media magazines in June.

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02/28/2011

Printed Magazines: Young Adult Readership Up & 90% Prefer Ink Format!


Pundits predicting the extinction of printed mags are wrong! In fact, printed mag readership (especially among the under 35 group with digital exposure) has steadily risen over the past 5 years, even through the recession…as reported by David McDonald (bio at ‘Read and learn more’ link below) in FOLIO magazine.

Now, I don’t know if the ad revenue has matched the same performance of the ‘readership’ stats (from what I’ve read, it hasn’t)…but, if the ad revenue is indeed down, this non-expert wonders why? It would not be logical on the surface. If the advertisers are just pulling the ad money from print to concentrate on the new digital formats, it would appear they are missing a growing opportunity, huh?    

On to David McDonald’s article:

Teach Your Children Well

Is the training of tomorrow’s magazine and media professionals keeping up?

While many media pundits purport that magazine readership is dropping or that printed magazines are soon to be extinct, the truth emerges that year after year magazine readership continues to grow. In fact, magazine readership has increased for the past five years—right through the recession—according to MPA, which found that four out of five U.S. adults read magazines. Another 2010 survey from MRI discovered that young adults (those under 35) read the most, despite the abundance of new media alternatives. A recent CMO Council survey of 1,000 consumers with digital exposure indicated that 90 percent of magazine subscribers prefer the printed format to the new e-reader apps.

Consumers continue to engage magazines in the printed form, but they are also looking beyond print and accessing magazine content in very personal ways—Web sites, e-media, mobile and rich media, and various other content platforms are increasingly more relevant to today’s magazine and media consumer. This emerging diversity in how we encounter magazine content speaks to the complexity of how consumers engage the content they want—on their terms, in many formats and across multiple platforms—and again, only the content they want. So we better serve it up the way they want it, right?

Educating the Next Generation

Today’s magazine and media companies—as well as the staff of journalists and designers who package content for consumers—are working within a new world order. The rules of journalism are changing and Media Ethics are not immune from this evolution. Ethics, while important, are often irrelevant to a media transaction. Many publishers believe that those who drive the formation of ethical opinion will continue to refine their perspective within the larger media landscape and come to terms with the ideals of branded and custom content and the demands of what I call Transcendent Media platforms.

Do ethics, as we know them today, have a place in media? Yes, in some instances… but not all. The ideals of church and state that have for so long driven the philosophies, perspectives, and opinions of media must and will change to embrace the new world order of Transcendent Media. And this is an important fact to the universities teaching tomorrow’s magazine professionals.

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02/12/2011

Time, Inc. Tells Apple iPad: ‘Screw You!’


SI - Just one of Time, Inc.'s stable of mags

Did you realize that Time magazine, Inc. is the world’s largest mag company? I didn’t. But it does mean that they have some horsepower to go to war with Apple over iPad access mis-management (outrageous fees, controlling subscribers info, etc) for their own products as well as on behalf of  other magazine publishers.

Apple iPad might soon find their only mag & newspaper client is Rupert Murdoch’s new Daily…and readers can only read that on the iPad to the exclusion of all other eReaders…and there are MANY with more to come…what a trashing of customer base!

Please read my other posts RE Apple iPad access and apps on Writers Welcome Blog for more background on this sticky publishing intrigue. I have conveniently listed them consecutively here.

Jeff Bercovici of Forbes.com has the latest on Time magazine’s blow-by-blow with Apple:

Time, Inc. Strikes Blows for Publishers in Standoff with Apple

For Time Inc., the world’s biggest magazine company, the quickest way to get it titles onto iPad screens may be getting them onto other tablets first.

While other publishers wrangle with Apple over the ins and outs of subscription sales in the iTunes store — How big a cut does Apple get to keep? Who gets control of the consumer’s information? Should the customer get to choose? — Time Inc. is moving ahead diagonally, making deals with the makers of other devices in hopes of gaining leverage in its negotiations with Apple.

Today, Sports Illustrated introduced an “All Access” subscription plan that will allow readers to pay one price to read the magazine in print, online, on Samsung Galaxy tablets and on Android phones. Although newspapers including The Wall Street Journal already offer such an option, SI is the first magazine to do so, according to managing editor Terry McDonell. The news comes just in time for the magazine’s swimsuit issue, its biggest annual seller.

“This is an important and fulfilling day because it marks the end of a very long march for us,” he said at a press conference. A combined print/digital subscription will cost $48 for one year or $4.99 a month; existing print subscribers will have free digital access for the remainder of their terms.

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