Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

07/10/2012

A Disregard for Intellectual Property Among the Younger Generation? Prevalent Piracy


Give me your content, Mate!

The digital highways and byways are becoming more and more crowded with mobile devices. These wonderful little gadgets are a boon to publishers in providing multiple avenues to get their content out in front of more readers/consumers. 

The mobiles also bring a downside, however — increased piracy! Seems these little devils, multiplying like horny energizer bunnies, are hard to police. ‘It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.’

You ask, “What the hell is a Bit Torrent site?” [I had to ask that question :)] Well, here is the definition link .

Lucia Moses provides some insight into how digital magazines are being ripped off through their mobile apps in this piece for Adweek

Publishers’ Online Headache

With tablets come opportunity, but also online piracy

With mobile devices, magazines have more ways than ever to distribute their content—and more ways of getting ripped off.

Like the music and movie businesses before them, magazines are getting their own taste of piracy with the spread of tablets and handheld mobile devices. It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.

Publishers say piracy is concentrated overseas where no sooner do they get a site shut down than another one pops up in its place. And with all the focus on distributing their content as widely as possible, they don’t really know the scope of the problem or what it’s costing them in lost sales.

“[It’s] a real problem for the future as we get a lot more of these devices out there and it becomes harder to police it,” said Declan Moore, president of publishing and digital media for the National Geographic Society. “There is a general concern that, among the younger generation, there is a disregard for intellectual property.”

With just a few keystrokes, he found an online search engine offering a full year’s worth of interactive Nat Geos (as well as what appeared to be a liberal selection of soft porn). “That’s not authorized, I’m pretty sure,” he said.

Dan Lagani, president of Reader’s Digest North America, said the pirated editions of Reader’s Digest that he sees tend to be lower-resolution and lack the interactivity that the magazine has built into its iPad, Kindle Fire and Nook versions. “It’s not the same consumer experience.”

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04/09/2011

Text-Messaging Publishing Suite


This is a suite that utilizes CMRL (the Concise Message Routing Language) to allow people to text websites…And, everybody knows (I didn’t, of course!)… that text messaging is the world’s most powerful and direct marketing medium.

Having said this, and realizing I’m in unexplored territory in my knowledge base, I will introduce you to the expert in this field: DOTGO, a powerful mobile publishing platform, in this press release yanked from Bradenton.com (nice weather in Bradenton, FL., by the way):

DOTGO Launches Text Messaging Publishing Suite for All 100 Million Internet Domains

CMRL-Based Suite Makes Person-to-Website Text Messaging Available to All

Text-messaging technology leader DOTGO today announced the launch of its much-anticipated web-based publishing suite, allowing all 100 million Internet domains to take advantage of text messaging, the world’s most powerful and direct marketing medium.

The new web-based interface, called DOTGO Publisher, is built on top of DOTGO’s mobile markup language CMRL, the Concise Message Routing Language. With its release of the new tool, DOTGO has leveled the playing field for those seeking to use text messaging to promote their brands–from individuals and small businesses to leading media companies.

Prior to DOTGO, running a text messaging service was very expensive, time-consuming, and relied on software that was either technically complex or limiting. DOTGO eliminates these obstacles, bringing text messaging to all 100 million Internet domains, by introducing two unique ideas. First, DOTGO maps the first word of any text message sent to the phone number DOTCOM (368266) to the corresponding .com Internet domain name. For example, anyone with a cell phone can access a site like google.com by texting the word “google” to the phone number DOTCOM (368266). This means all 100 million Internet domain names now have a way for their users to text them. Users of .edu, .gov, .net, and .org domains can similarly use the phone numbers DOTEDU (368338), DOTGOV (368468), DOTNET (368638), and DOTORG (368674).

Second, DOTGO has developed the first and only markup language for text messaging, called CMRL, the Concise Message Routing Language. CMRL does for text messaging what HTML does for the web: it allows web developers to author the text messaging responses for their Internet domain names. The introduction of DOTGO Publisher brings the power of CMRL and DOTGO to all non-developers, and features a site builder for authoring CMRL, a message center for broadcasting messages, and analytics for showing detailed text messaging statistics for an Internet domain name.

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12/02/2010

Digital is Growing Up


A little visionary post tonight…As much as I can envision the future anyway (being retarded makes it difficult).

We talk about “traditional” print publishing today as old hat. Well, not too far into the future the new tablet computers, eReaders and other mobile devices will be “traditional” or old hat also. Just like the old bulky camcorders (remember them?) have given way to more diminutive devices.

After all, who will need ANYTHING you have to carry to compute on, or receive data on, when you will probably be able to think, or command in some other way, data molecules right out of the air into holograms for such tasks!

Ouch! All this prognosticating has left me drained! But, to get back to the present, just how is the state of digital publications doing after their first introduction about 10 years ago (damn has it been that long)?

Here is an article by Matt Kinsman of FOLIO magazine that examines the “Digital Editions: The State of the Industry”:

As the digital edition industry near 10 years of age, Nxtbook Media recently wrapped a survey called “Digital Editions: The State of the Industry,” which polled 233 publishers on their overall satisfaction with digital editions as audience tools and revenue generators, and how mobile apps and tablets will influence their strategy going forward.

Interestingly, Nxtbook concluded from the results that there is great latent potential in digital magazines from the perspective of the publisher. In terms of priorities, Nxtbook believes, publishers are more focused on increasing circulation for digital magazines and selling advertising more effectively into the format, than they are on apps and mobile solutions.

When it comes to the circulation of their digital magazines, about 40 percent reported modest to great satisfaction. On the other hand, 38 percent were somewhat dissatisfied while 22 percent were quite dissatisfied.

However, b-to-b publishers seem more pleased with digital magazines at this point than their consumer counterparts, with 50 percent saying they are somewhat to greatly pleased with their digital circulation.

Read and learn more

06/16/2010

Mobile Publishing Has a Ticket to Ride!



There is a plan afoot that just might rescue magazines and newspapers from a slow death and make them readily available online and profitable to boot!

The rescue is being carried out by the mobile digital devices flooding the market recently and the new mobiles waiting in the wings…such as the Dell Streak or the Samsung Galaxy.

John Kennedy writes this in the SiliconRepublic.com:

Watch out Apple CEO Steve Jobs, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is now in the digital news reader market having acquired Skiff, a Hearst-backed tech start-up that helps distribute newspaper and magazine content and could provide stiff competition to the iPad.

Murdoch has been one of the strongest proponents of building paywalls around newspapers and wants to follow on the success of successful properties like the Wall Street Journal and The Times of London.

Murdoch has acquired Skiff LLU (pictured above), a maker of a flexible news reader device, as well as a company called Journalism Online LLC, which is developing technology that helps publishers collect micro-payments from readers online.

He hopes that both acquisitions will lend support to his quest to help newspaper publishers be as profitable online as they once were in print.

The Skiff digital reader which Murdoch plans to bring to market later this year features an 11.5-inch grayscale touchscreen that allows users to download material wirelessly from Skiff’s online store.

The first material to feature on the Skiff digital reader will be the Financial Times, the New York Times, Forbes, Popular Mechanics, Random House and Simon & Schuster. The technology could also be licensed out to hardware from other manufacturers, appearing perhaps as an app on an Android phone or tablet computer.

Mobile publishing business to boom
The mobile publishing business is about to go stellar thanks to devices like the Apple iPad which have allowed publishers to redefine how news and magazine content is delivered online via apps. Magazines and newspapers that have delivered breakthrough iPad apps include Wired, Time magazine and the Financial Times, while news apps like the Pulse Reader, BBC News, Reuters News Pro and AP News are breaking new ground in online news distribution.

The online advertising side of the coin is also hard to ignore. Last week, Apple revealed that its iAd platform already has US$60m in ad bookings – 50pc of all North America’s mobile ads for H2 2010.

Quite rightly this has online publishers worried about whether they will be excluded from Apple’s devices – now almost 60pc of all mobile devices in the US – and led to the CEO of Google’s recently acquired AdMob expressing his concerns over recent changes to Apple’s terms for app developers.

Either way, for such a young market, the energy and competition about to be unleashed is mesmerising and with new devices entering the fray all the time like the Dell Streak or the Samsung Galaxy, a whole new paradigm in publishing is about to be unleashed with News Corp, Apple and Google currently leading the land grab.

04/19/2010

Publishing Venture Bets on iPhone Short Stories

Filed under: digital short stories,Ethet Books,iPhones,ipods,mobile devices — gator1965 @ 1:44 pm



Talk about niche-need forecasting! A new publisher, Ether Books, launching today at the London Book Fair, will be offering short stories and poems over smaller mobile devices people already own.

Georgina Prodhan, reporting for the Washington Post, spells it out this way:

A new publishing company is betting that readers will bypass electronic readers such as Amazon’s Kindle and Sony’s Reader in favor of reading bite-sized stories on mobile devices they already own.

Ether Books will launch at the London Book Fair on Monday, and will offer a catalog of short stories, essays and poetry initially via Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch, by authors including Alexander McCall-Smith and Louis de Bernieres.

Well over 1 billion mobile phones are expected to be sold worldwide this year, compared with just a few million e-readers. Apple alone has already sold more than 85 million iPhone and iPod touch devices, and has just launched its iPad tablet PCs.

“The tech press may be slavering over the iPad, Kindle and Sony eReader as traditional publishers leap over themselves to expand their e-book offerings,” Ether Books Digital Director Maureen Scott said.

“But at Ether Books we’ve made the decision to go straight to distributing short works via our iPhone app to devices people already own, are familiar with and are happy to use when they have 10-15 minutes to spare.”

Scott previously worked for British technology group Psion, was a director of U.S. mobile Web pioneer Openwave and managed the development of the first airline consumer self-booking reservation product at British Airways.

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