Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

02/15/2014

A Current View of the Publishing Revolution


It’s always been extremely hard for the outsider analyst (or any other uninitiated person of interest) to gather unit sales figures for books — Why? Simply because book sale data are secret. This nontransparency is not true of any other media outlet – only books.

However, some book and publishing industry entrepreneurs (and authorpreneurs) have devised their own analytical models based on certain assumptions and have produced some fairly logical conclusions RE unit book sales.

Now enters an author and publishing pro with a high level understanding of advanced programming who has designed software that supposedly grabs all this secret unit sales book data from online bestseller lists. With this data, more accurate charts with some interesting numbers can be produced (such as the one at left).

Let’s dive into these figures a little more with tonight’s great source reference article published on io9.com with exceptional links and comments from readers (sorry, I can’t link this site. Just paste io9.com into your address bar):

This chart ought to make the publishing industry very nervous

Wool author Hugh Howey has been beating the drum for self-publishing for a long time — but now he claims to have data to back it up. His new report on author earnings contains some startling figures, but none more so than the above chart showing indie authors beating traditional publishers on unit sales.

As Howey himself admits, the data in his new “Author Earnings” report is incomplete at best, because publishers and booksellers (including Amazon) don’t release raw book sales figures. You can find out exactly how much a movie made in its opening weekend, and how many people supposedly watched last night’s TV shows — but book sale data is secret.

According to Howey, this new data comes from “an author with advanced coding skills who had created a software program that can crawl online bestseller lists and grab mountains of data.” The data all appears to be just for Amazon, which means you have to trust Amazon’s accuracy on top of the accuracy of crunching the numbers. And there’s also the fact that looking at unit sales is possibly misleading — if you sell 1,000 copies of a book at $1 each, you might be getting way more unit sales than an ebook going for $10 each, but the revenue will still be low.

But Howey also includes some charts that claim to break down author income by publishing type, and they show a number of self-published authors making hundreds of thousands, or even over a million, dollars per year.

Howey adds:

Research article continues here

This Publishing/Writing Blog is available on your Kindle :)))

12/20/2012

Some Publishing ‘Easy Buttons’ (Samhain Publishing, PubMatch, CoreSource)


a worldwide community for the publishing industry that encourages the creation of business relationships and the worldwide spreading of ideas.

a worldwide community for the publishing industry that encourages the creation of business relationships and the worldwide spreading of ideas.

A few publishing industry tidbits for those who might not know or may be in need of reminding.

Tonight’s post is loaded with informative links 🙂

From Publishers Weekly:

Samhain Uploads 2,000 Titles To PubMatch

Samhain Publishing has uploaded over 2,000 titles to PubMatch, complete with full descriptions and EPUB files so that users can view partial contents of each book. The titles were uploaded via Ingram’s CoreSource. While people can view these titles, if they want to contact Samhain for any purpose, they need to be a member of PubMatch.

Currently, the American Library Association is in the process of uploading their last two years of publications via CoreSource, as well. PubMatch is the book-publishing and rights database founded by Publishers Weekly and Combined Book Exhibit.

 

10/11/2012

What is a Global Publishing System ?


Harper Collins is going to implement such a grand system — and goes into the generalities in the following reference — BUT, the details that would tell us just how this system would deliver the touted results are conspicuously absent, as far as I am concerned.

You tell me.

You know, sometimes I feel the older I get the dumber I get — That’s why I need things explained to me like in the ‘Blah Blah For Dummies’ series 🙂  

Excerpt: “It is our responsibility to provide our authors with the broadest possible reach through our global print and digital publishing platforms, regardless of where their books originate and what format they take,” said Larry Nevins, Executive Vice-President, Operations. 

This offered in Publishers Weekly:

Harper To Implement Global Publishing System

Harper Collins is to roll out a new global publishing system, which it claims is “one of the largest undertakings of its kind to be implemented by a trade publisher.”

Developed in partnership with Publishing Technology and built on its advance platform, Global Product Manager will enable the unifying of editorial, marketing and business data around the world, widening the reach of HC’s print and digital publications in its core target markets. By integrating systems and assets across the globe, the new system will provide the company with the long-term infrastructure needed to maximize its extensive catalogue of books, ebooks and apps, empowering HC staff to explore current and future content delivery types and business models, while enabling better metadata management to improve discoverability.

The system will be rolled out first in the US, followed by the UK and subsequently Canada and Australia, as well as to the Christian Publishing Division through 2013.

Read and learn more

Get this Publishing/Writing blog on your Kindle

09/01/2011

Print’s Alive, but Publishing Still in Trouble? (Actually it’s NOT)


 

Is Publishing in Trouble or Not?

Apparently, a main theme coming out of the July 2011 Yale Publishing Conference was that ‘fear’ was at the center of all the chaos in the modern publishing world.

This is true … But, duhhhh, who didn’t already understand that! Of course it’s fear of change that is holding publishing back from being all it can be.

Fear of change and the unknown (or not understood) has always been a prevalent weakness for most Homo sapiens. 

Stefanie Botelho, writing for FOLIO Magazine, covered the conference:

If Print Isn’t Dead, Why is Publishing Still in Trouble?

Reasons why explored at Yale Publishing Conference.

At the Yale Publishing Conference, which took place last month in New Haven, CT, big names in magazine publishing were in attendance, both as students and teachers.

The session began with Richard Foster, senior faculty fellow at Yale School of Management and managing partner with the Millbrook Management Group, LLC. He philosophized about the term “creative destruction”, focusing its various implications in correlation to the publishing world.

Subsequent sessions led by Michael Clinton, president and marketing/publishing director of Hearst; president of Dwell Media Michela O’Connor Abrams; and Glamour editor-in-chief Cynthia Leive ran the gamut of print, digital and staffing challenges.

But the biggest theme, prevalent in how speakers addressed the crowd and the audience pressed the presenters for immediate solutions to admittedly complex problems (the transition to digital, etc.), was not listed in the printed program.

It was fear.

And that may be the largest issue the publishing industry is facing today: fear of the present, fear of the future, fear of the audience and, perhaps the most crippling, fear of change.

While not as easily palpable in the speakers (who each provided case study after case study of success within their companies), both lecturers and audience members rippled with it. Age jokes were dropped at a noticeable rate (O’Connor Abrams quipped she and only one other staffer are over 30) and tales of staff let go because of unwillingness to convert to the digital age (and assist in the bevy of products unrelated to actual print issues) were some of the most poignant of the day. The message was clear: get onboard or get out, because there are plenty of others to take your seat at the publishing table—many of them young enough to still be crashing with Mom and Dad.

Read and learn more

Get this great blog on your Kindle! 🙂

05/26/2011

Many Authors Don’t Take Their Publishing Seriously?


Not today. Not in this new era of empowered publishing. Everyone is running to just get their “baby” published and get their name out there in web-land.

And, of course, their are the usual carnival barkers just trying to sell something through print.

The serious self-publishers today (and they are in the minority) do strive to learn all they can about the publishing craft…INCLUDING traditional publishing standards and guidelines RE editing, copyediting, layout, design, etc…

More details at Publishing Perspectives.com by Justine Tal Goldberg :

200 Million Americans Want to Publish Books, But Can They?

Some 200 Million Americans say they want to publish a book, but lack of attendance at the IBPA’s Publishing University at BEA suggests a disregard for the craft of book publishing.

It’s often said the book fairs are no place for writers. But what about at a conference organized specifically to help writers publish?

According to writer Joseph Epstein, “81 percent of Americans feel that they have a book in them — and should write it.” That’s approximately 200 million people who aspire to authorship. Excluding those who want and never do, and those who do but never publish, we’re still looking at millions of folks hungry for the literary limelight. In light of recent trends in publishing — the fact that self-published titles have dwarfed traditionally published works nearly 2:1 — one would expect that the Independent Book Publishers Association’s 27th annual Publishing University, a concurrent event with BookExpo America at New York City’s Javits Center this week, would have been swarming with author-publishers on the prowl for a much-needed literary education. Strangely, it wasn’t.

Read and learn more

01/11/2010

Looking for Suggestions


A big hello and thank you to all my special followers and visitors…I’m going to take a few minutes today and ask for your input…It will be much appreciated.

I scour all kinds of publishing and writing industry data and resources to bring you the very latest insider-info, trends and predictions in this great industry…BUT, I want to know if you have any specific topics, not covered or otherwise, you would like to see researched and discussed here. If you have any wants or ideas, please leave a comment to this post and I will take action.

Again, I want to thank all my followers and visitors for your support and humbly ask that you invite all your friends and colleagues to visit the Writers Welcome Blog and become followers as well.

I am here to serve…and the more I can serve the better I feel!

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: