Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

06/28/2016

Barnes & Noble’s Nook Press Offers Shelf Space to Self-Publishing Authors


nook press logoSelf-published authors who have obtained a certain level of ebook sales can now print publish their books and sell them in B&N stores and online at BN.com. This means that B&N will offer these authors a coordinated, national distribution, never before available.

My, my – it appears that self-published authors are now being sought after and even accommodated a little. Of course, all things publishing has been changing dramatically over the past few years and self-published authors are now even allowed to use the indoor bathrooms at literary events 🙂

This announcement came from Digital Book World today:

Barnes & Noble announced today the launch of a new self-publishing, print platform called Nook Press, which will allow authors to turn their ebooks into print versions that can be sold in B&N stores and online at BN.com.

The program is self-service and allows authors to create both hardcover and paperback versions.

Through the program, authors who have sold 1,000 copies of a single ebook in the past year will be able to sell their print books on the local, regional or national level through B&N.

Moreover, authors who have sold 500 copies of a single ebook in the past year are eligible to participate in in-store events at B&N, including book-signings and discussions.

If eligible authors want their books to be considered for in-store placement, they can submit their books for review to B&N’s Small Press Department and one of the company’s corporate category buyers. To participate in in-store events, eligible authors can submit for an event review from a B&N store manager.

“Barnes & Noble is proud to be the first to offer coordinated, national distribution for self-published authors who will benefit from in-store placement at Barnes & Noble stores and online at BN.com,” said Fred Argir, B&N’s chief digital officer, in a press release. “No one else can offer self-published authors a retail presence like Barnes & Noble can.”

What do you all think about Barnes & Noble’s Nook Press? At least they are trying – even though the effort is in their interest to save their own ass a little, too.

07/17/2015

Is It Possible That Amazon Is Not ‘All’ Bad News For Publishers?


Might Amazon’s debilitating effect on local shops be about to change?

For the past 20 years Amazon has disrupted the publishing industry from stem to stern. Could it be that much of the resulting adaptation and metamorphosis has actually been good news for publishers?

Depends on what you consider. What kind of publisher? What kind of book? Book audience location. Book platform. Book distribution system access. Digital technology, etc., etc.

Hell, many of these considerations weren’t even in existence 20 years ago! And while Amazon didn’t create or discover all of the above mentioned ingredients, they were the first to mix them in a masterful menu – creating a smorgasbord of possibilities – the understanding of which is still being deciphered today.

Tonight’s topic will discuss the how’s and where’s of some of the possible positive changes that Amazon has wrought within the publishing industry and the reaction/attitude of the big five publishing houses as well as others (Bowker’s, etc.) in the overall industry.

Key excerpts from tonight’s research/resource article:

“It has been presented as a David and Goliath battle. This is despite the underdog status of the largest publishing houses in the world. As Amazon has become the primary destination for books online, it has been able to lower book prices through their influence over the book trade. Many have argued that this has reduced the book to “a thing of minimal value”.”

“Despite this pervasive narrative of the evil overlord milking its underlings for all their worth, Amazon has actually offered some positive changes in the publishing industry over the last 20 years. Most notably, the website has increased the visibility of books as a form of entertainment in a competitive media environment. This is an achievement that should not be diminished in our increasingly digital world.”

Presenting:

Amazon is 20 years old – and far from bad news for publishers

By , as published in The Conversation (UK). Academic rigor, journalistic flair  

It has now been 20 years since Amazon sold its first book: the titillating-sounding Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies, by Douglas Hofstadter. Since then publishers have often expressed concern over Amazon. Recent public spates with Hachette and Penguin Random House have heightened the public’s awareness of this fraught relationship.

It has been presented as a David and Goliath battle. This is despite the underdog status as the largest publishing houses in the world. As Amazon has become the primary destination for books online, it has been able to lower book prices through their influence over the book trade. Many have argued that this has reduced the book to “a thing of minimal value”.

Despite this pervasive narrative of the evil overlord milking its underlings for all their worth, Amazon has actually offered some positive changes in the publishing industry over the last 20 years. Most notably, the website has increased the visibility of books as a form of entertainment in a competitive media environment. This is an achievement that should not be diminished in our increasingly digital world.

Democratising data

In Amazon’s early years, Jeff Bezos, the company’s CEO, was keen to avoid stocking books. Instead, he wanted to work as a go-between for customers and wholesalers. Instead of building costly warehouses, Amazon would instead buy books as customers ordered them. This would pass the savings on to the customers. (It wasn’t long, however, until Amazon started building large warehouses to ensure faster delivery times.)

This promise of a large selection of books required a large database of available books for customers to search. Prior to Amazon’s launch, this data was available to those who needed it from Bowker’s Books in Print, an expensive data source run by the people who controlled the International Standardised Book Number (ISBN) standard in the USA.

ISBN was the principle way in which people discovered books, and Bowker controlled this by documenting the availability of published and forthcoming titles. This made them one of the most powerful companies in the publishing industry and also created a division between traditional and self-published books.

Bowker allowed third parties to re-use their information, so Amazon linked this data to their website. Users could now see any book Bowker reported as available. This led to Amazon’s boasts that they had the largest bookstore in the world, despite their lack of inventory in their early years. But many other book retailers had exactly the same potential inventory through access to the same suppliers and Bowker’s Books in Print.

Amazon’s decision to open up the data in Bowker’s Books in Print to customers democratised the ability to discover of books that had previously been locked in to the sales system of physical book stores. And as Amazon’s reputation improved, they soon collected more data than Bowker.

For the first time, users could access data about what publishers had recently released and basic information about forthcoming titles. Even if customers did not buy books from Amazon, they could still access the information. This change benefited publishers as readers who can quickly find information about new books are more likely to buy new books.

World domination?

As Amazon expanded beyond books, ISBN was no longer the most useful form for recalling information about items they sold. So the company came up with a new version: Amazon Standardized Identifier Numbers (ASINs), Amazon’s equivalent of ISBNs. This allowed customers to shop for books, toys and electronics in one place.

The ASIN is central to any Amazon catalogue record and with Amazon’s expansion into selling eBooks and second hand books, it connects various editions of books. ASINs are the glue that connect eBooks on the Kindle to shared highlights, associated reviews, and second hand print copies on sale. Publishers, and their supporters, can use ASINs as a way of directing customers to relevant titles in new ways.

Will Cookson’s Bookindy is an example of this. The mobile app allows readers to find out if a particular book is available for sale cheaper than Amazon in an independent bookstore nearby. So Amazon’s advantage of being the largest source of book-related information is transformed into a way to build the local economy.

ASINs are primarily useful for finding and purchasing books from within the Amazon bookstore, but this is changing. For example, many self-published eBooks don’t have ISBNs, so Amazon’s data structure can be used to discover current trends in the publishing industry. Amazon’s data allows publishers to track the popularity of books in all forms and shape their future catalogues based on their findings.

While ISBNs will remain the standard for print books, ASIN and Amazon’s large amount of data clearly benefits publishers through increasing their visibility. Amazon have forever altered bookselling and the publishing industry, but this does not mean that its large database cannot be an invaluable resource for publishers who wish to direct customers to new books outside of Amazon.

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04/06/2015

Amazon Is Winning at Publishing – Here’s Some Reasons Why


Winning The Publishing Race

Tonight’s post will get into why Amazon is so much better at marketing and selling than the book publishing industry.

Briefly, the answer lies in push marketing versus pull marketing, timing (being late to the dinner table) and true innovation.

Tonight’s research/resource article is from The Digital Reader (Ink, Bits and Pixels) written by Nate Hoffelder:

 

The Ubiquitous Bookstore, Or Why Amazon is Winning at Publishing

Scholarly Kitchen posted an article yesterday which explains why Amazon is so much better at marketing and selling than the book publishing industry.

Joseph Esposito uses the post to lay out his vision for a new type of bookstore – one which could compete with Amazon. Describing Amazon as a destination site, Esposito sees its success as primarily due to pull marketing. In other words, Amazon draws people in by offering a huge warehouse of books and a great shopping experience.

To compete with Amazon, Esposito thinks publishers need to adapt to the new nature of the internet:

But the Web is now being brought to us; it’s evolving into a push medium. All that time we spend looking at the news feeds for Facebook, Flipboard, and Twitter point to where the Web is going and where new bookstores will have to be. To build a bookstore that goes head to head with Amazon is foolhardy. It would be easier to carry the ball into the defensive line of the Chicago Bears.

So a new bookstore is going to have to bring its offerings to where people are rather than the other way around; a new bookstore has to be ubiquitous. A recent example of this comes from HarperCollins,which has created an arrangement with Twitter to sell copies of the bestselling Divergent series of young adult novels from within individual tweets.

The fact that this is a topic of discussion in the publishing industry, in 2015 no less – folks, this is why Amazon is winning whatever war publishing feels it is fighting with the retailer.

It’s not that Esposito is wrong so much as that he is five years late to the discussion. Both Amazon and authors started push marketing at least 5 years ago.

 

Authors have been on social media since at least 2010, and they’ve been pushing people to bookstore to buy books. This concept is so well established that there are dozens of blog posts by indie authors which discuss the nuances of how to go about it.

What’s more, Amazon mastered the concept of push marketing even further back. I don’t know exactly when Amazon launched its affiliate network, but that was explicitly designed to give other websites a financial incentive to push customers to Amazon (h\t to Marshall Poe for making a similar argument in TSK’s comment section).

Tell me, can I make more money by pushing people to HarperCollins’ bookstore than by sending them to Amazon? No? Then why would I bother?

Speaking of HarperCollins, they are a great example of a publisher trying and failing to market and sell directly to consumers. Have you visited HarperCollins.com, and tried to browse, search, or buy an ebook?

I have, and so have several commenters on The Passive Voice. It’s terrible. If, as Esposito posits, direct retail is the future of publishing, then HC literally cannot build a retail site to save its life.

But never mind HarperCollins; let’s consider what Esposito wrote next:

From a conceptual point of view, the most interesting project I have stumbled upon for “post-destination” bookstores is that of Chris Kubica, who explained his work in two articles in Publishers Weekly, which you can find here and here. Kubica gathered a group of publishing people in New York to brainstorm about a post-Amazon bookstore. The conclusion was that each individual potentially could be the site or source of a bookstore–a bookstore of one. With seven billion people on the planet (and growing), that’s potentially seven billion bookstores. Now, how can Amazon compete with that?

Easy. Amazon thought of it first, they thought of it ages ago, and they do it better than anyone in publishing.

Folks, if you want to beat Amazon then you need to come up with an idea first. You can’t decide to adopt an SOP five years after it becomes an SOP. That’s not innovative; it’s reactionary.

 

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02/28/2015

The First Crowdsourced Publishing Platform


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John R. Austin Writes Publishing Industry News

AND, guess who is bringing it to fruition? — Amazon. In the form of its Amazon Kindle Scout program. Kindle Scout announced it will release its first set of 10 reader-selected titles next month.

Husna Haq of The Christian Monitor wrote tonight’s research/Resource article:

Will Amazon’s Kindle Scout democratize publishing?

Key excerpt: “Launched in October, the program lets readers vote for their favorite unpublished titles from a collection of manuscripts submitted for consideration by aspiring authors. Readers get to first preview an excerpt from unreleased books, then nominate up to three for publishing. The Kindle Scout team then tallies how many votes each the book received and decides which are suitable for publishing.”

Call it the American Idol of books, the democratization of publishing, the crowdsourcing of literature.

Amazon’s Kindle Scout, one of the first crowdsourced publishing platforms, announced it will release its first set of 10 reader-voted titles March 3.

The first set of books include science fiction, romance, thriller, and mystery novels, including “G1” by Rigel Carson (science fiction), “A Highland Knight’s Desire” by Amy Jarecki (romance), and “L.A. Sniper” by Steve Gannon (thriller).

Launched in October, the program lets readers vote for their favorite unpublished titles from a collection of manuscripts submitted for consideration by aspiring authors. Readers get to first preview an excerpt from unreleased books, then nominate up to three for publishing. The Kindle Scout team then tallies how many votes each the book received and decides which are suitable for publishing.

“Since we opened our doors we’ve been busy weighing the feedback of over 29,000 enthusiastic Scouts who have nominated the books they want to read next,” Dina Hilal, general manager for Kindle Scout, said in astatement. “These first 10 titles signal a new option for authors, who can choose to have their books discovered and supported by Amazon customers even before they are published.”

Authors whose books are chosen receive a 5-year renewable publishing deal, with a $1,500 advance, a royalty rate of 50 percent, and the ability to take back rights to the book if the author doesn’t earn at least $25,000 during the 5-year contract.

The approach benefits Amazon in many ways. As Geekwire points out, it leverages the company’s large customer base for market research, similar to the way that Amazon Studios asks viewers to weigh in on television pilots before deciding which will go into full production.

It also gives Amazon access to a slew of up-and-coming authors who will remember that Amazon, not a traditional publishing house, gave them their first opportunity.

And finally, it offers the company folks in publishing love to hate some good PR: Amazon Scout is, in effect, a feel-good story about a large corporation helping indie authors get published and get noticed.

Amazon today opened up Scout to more genres. The company is now accepting contemporary fiction, historical fiction, and action & adventure submissions in addition to romance, mystery/thriller and science fiction.

Here are the 10 titles chosen by Amazon Scouts for publication March 3:

 

Well, what do you readers think? Good idea or not?

 

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11/08/2014

Writing About Sex? Why Not, It’s a Universal Aspect of Human Nature


Author and senior vice-president of sales at Penguin Random House, Ananth Padmanabhan

I came across a review of an interesting book on erotica that poses some interesting questions and concepts Re sex and romantic love.

The book, “Play With Me”, is written by Ananth Padmanabhan, who is the senior vice-president of sales at Penguin Random House, and it is his debut novel.

Author Ananth feels there is a big gap in the market today of books dealing with the heart, mind and body and where do you draw the line between them (and/or connect them) when it comes to sex and romantic love. And he should know about any gaps in the market — being the senior vice-president of sales at Penguin Random House and part of the publishing industry for nearly two decades.

“The past few years have seen a lot of short erotic stories being published but novels aren’t so common. I have written short erotic pieces before, but this is the first novel of this kind from India in the male voice,” he says.

 “How does one draw a line between heart and body? When does the mind kick in? What does pleasure do to our notion of love?” he asks.

I have written a few steamy scenes in my past projects and Ananth’s approach and the questions it raises about sex and love is something that begs more understanding or, at least, consideration in developing motives and characters.

Now, this piece from The Hindu newspaper by journalist Preeti Zachariah:

 

Love, lust, and life

“It is not autobiographical at all. I wanted to write about sex — it’s a universal aspect of human nature…” says Ananth Padmanabhan, about his debut novel Play with Me.

 

“Can one person be in love with two people, in very different ways? Yes, he can,” says Ananth Padmanabhan, whose debut novel Play with Me (Penguin, Rs.250) is a somewhat salacious take on the eternal love triangle.

The book tells the story of Sid, a successful photographer in an ad-agency and his two radically different relationships with two women — the gorgeous, free-spirited Cara who changes the way he thinks about erotic pleasure and Natasha towards whom he feels romantic love.

“How does one draw a line between heart and body? When does the mind kick in? What does pleasure do to our notion of love?” he asks.

Here in the city to release the book at Starmark, the author is remarkably candid about his reasons for writing it. “It is not autobiographical at all. I wanted to write about sex — it’s a universal aspect of human nature. And there is a big gap in the market today.”

He should know — Ananth, who is the senior vice-president, sales at Penguin Random House, has been part of the publishing industry for nearly two decades. “The past few years have seen a lot of short erotic stories being published but novels aren’t so common. I have written short erotic pieces before but this is the first novel of this kind from India in the male voice,” he says.

Also at the release was psychiatrist Vijay Nagaswami and journalist Yagna Balaji. Dr. Nagaswami attempted to define erotica. “It’s not just about sex but about people in unabashedly sexual relationships. Erotica is about using a feather, pornography is about using the whole chicken,” he smiles.  Using the popular Fifty Shades of Grey as a reference point, he wondered whether off-beat sexual themes garnered better audience response.

Ananth demurs by saying “For pleasure to be extraordinary, it doesn’t have to be unusual. I wanted this to be real and normal. This is an intense book, written with a lot of integrity that captures what goes on in the character’s mind.” Yagna adds that unlike many other books that claim to titillate, there is no flowery language and veiled allusions. This is the real thing.

Ananth explains, “I wanted to understand how pleasure is impacted by the notion of love. There is no universal formula, however,” he says. “Many times we get into relationships which seem right at that point of our lives, even if we know that they probably aren’t long-term ones.”

“Sex is a fundamental need — there is no morality associated with it,” feels Ananth. Any decision you make is okay if you can live with it yourself.  We constantly seek pleasure. Relationships are all about pleasure. Why should I be apologetic about it?” he asks.

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06/25/2014

Con’t: Book Launches, Stress, Introverted Authors = Spicy Gumbo of PPTSD (Post-Publishing Traumatic Stress Disorder)


Sharon Glassman

Yesterday’s post continued:

If, indeed, you tend to be stressed out and introverted and suck all the energy out of a room when involved in performing your publishing/author events (launching and marketing your book/s),  there ARE ways you can write the calming solutions right into your own event before hand — And, Sharon Glassman shows you how in her piece in the HuffPost below and when she lets you Meet the introvert heroine of her traveling novel-with-songs, BLAME IT ON HOBOKEN in this short video.

A traveling novel-with-songs is an intriguing vision in and of itself 🙂

 

5 Tips to Reduce Stress for Introvert and Highly-Sensitive Authors

If you’re an Introvert or Highly-Sensitive author, launching your book can traumatize you naturally. This excessive stress can lead to a condition I’ve named PPTSD (Post-Publishing Traumatic Stress Disorder). The name sounds funny. But its effects are serious.

(Read my feature about PPTSD here).

How can introverts and HSP authors publish our books successfully – and wholeheartedly – while honoring our need to recharge? How can we defuse our natural tendency to absorb a room’s energy during on an event-packed book launch or tour?

1) Eat the elephant in small bites to ward off the tiger

“The tiger” is a common metaphor for acute stress disorders and trauma. The metaphor refers to the fight-or-flight scenario of a cave dweller confronting a saber tooth tiger.

A book launch isn’t a tiger attack. Our higher brain knows this, intellectually. But our lower brain doesn’t differentiate between book-stress and tiger-stress. It leaps into survival mode when it feels threatened. And it can get stuck there. Trust me. It’s not fun.

One way to slow the brain’s rush to tiger-town?

Divide your Big Book Launch into bite-sized tasks. And then:

Celebrate each completed task.

Rest.

Repeat.

Why?

The brain’s repeated experience of small victories can create neural pathways that link your book launch process with feelings of achievement.

These positive links can boost your immunity to large stresses – and even minor annoyances, like my mixed metaphor about the tiger and the elephant.

2. Write “set breaks” into your work day

Have you noticed how bands hire opening acts or take set breaks during a show?

It’s an idea worth copying. Build, then satisfy your fans’ desire for your creative product by offering them your presence in packets. Enlist a musical or literary opening act. Create set breaks (official or ad-hoc) during a live event to conserve and recharge your physical energy.

The set-break concept is also useful on everyday workdays.

As Christine Gust, a former Halliburton HR manager who teaches practical applications of stress management tools in Colorado likes to say, “It’s amazing how much you can achieve by going for a walk.”

3. Schedule A Daily Author’s Retreat

“You need to retreat every day,” says Maureen Clancy, a New Jersey-based holistic psychotherapist and Highly-Sensitive Person, about the need for quiet amid a busy book tour or launch.

“Build it into your schedule, like you’re going to the dentist. Although, hopefully being with yourself will be more pleasant than going to the dentist.”

4. Bring a familiar scent to parties and events.

This is another tip of Clancy’s, which I now practice. She finds lavender to be a very relaxing scent, but let your nose be your guide.

You can wear your scent on your skin or on a piece of fabric.

“What happens is you inhale it and it goes to the part of the parasympathetic nervous system that helps you relax,” Clancy says.

This is particularly helpful if you’ll be speaking – or singing – at an event.

As singer-songwriter Vance Gilbert tells his students: our body uses our heartbeat as its metronome.

It may help to think of your heartbeat as your body-clock’s second hand.

A racing heart makes us speak and sing faster. Our tongue is timed to our speeding heartbeat.

A calmer heartbeat prompts us to communicate more calmly, creating a truly human connection between author and audience.

And isn’t that what this whole book-writing thing is about?

5) How does an HSP/Introvert yell for help?

If this were a joke, the punch line would be, “Please don’t yell. Yelling traumatizes me.”

But it’s a serious question.

Introverts and HSPs need to tell ourselves and others when we’re being stressed to unhealthy extremes. Especially since we can be overwhelmed by experiences others find “fun” or “exciting.”

To this end, I’ve been thinking about the idea of “author advocates” – friends, colleagues, or publishing team members who’d be willing to help Introvert and HSP authors launch and promote their books in mutually-beneficial ways.

Right now, my Introvert Author Advocate is my self.

I ask “her” (aka: me), “What would you suggest that I do, as someone who knows me, my book, and the publishing biz?”

And so far, she’s come up with some good ideas.

Do you have other suggestions for publishing, promoting or touring a book as an Introvert/HSP author? Do Introvert/HSP tips work for extrovert authors as well?

Please share your thoughts in comments below and at Sharon’s HuffPostl article here:

 

 

 

 

06/24/2014

Book Launches, Stress, Introverted Authors = Spicy Gumbo of PPTSD (Post-Publishing Traumatic Stress Disorder)

Filed under: John R. Austin,publishing — gator1965 @ 10:18 pm
Tags: ,

This examination of a very real problem area is done with intense humor and mature articulation by Sharon Glassman — AND will be addressed in tomorrow’s post — since I just realized the time just flew by tonight and I have a very early get up and get chewed/screwed meeting tomorrow morning 🙂

I wish all well and will see you back here tomorrow.

 

John

05/24/2014

05/05/2014

Borrowing Credibility = Intelligent, Instant Marketing for Newbie Writers


“Damn, guys, I met Stephen King at a conference last week and you would be surprised what he told me about the tricks he used to get published for the first time!”

This statement will perk up your listeners’ ears and they will hang on and pay more attention to every word you say after that opening statement — simply because you are paraphrasing a credible source and not just spouting your own words (even though your own words may be just as knowledgeable and accurate on the subject matter).

And, you don’t have to meet credible, renowned personalities in-person — you can read their advice and teachings in articles and quote them as well.

Borrowing credibility lends instant marketing value to your content. A simple but powerful concept that is often overlooked or not appreciated and therefore not strategically applied.

More insight provided by Al Bargen from Wordpreneur dot com:

 

The Single Fastest Way to Build Credibility as a Virtually Unknown Writer

Okay, so you feel that practically nobody knows who you are. How do you expect people to read your book or blog post and believe what you’re saying? That’s a question we get a lot at my site, and people want to know how to become a credible source of information when they haven’t yet built a name for themselves.

The problem isn’t that these people (you?) are not credible sources of information. They’re usually just as credible as the first guy at the head of the popularity contest. But therein lies the problem. Credibility isn’t so much about being able to know what you’re talking about. It has much more to do with being the more popular source of information out there.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing as most people who become well-known as great sources of information are also people who know their stuff really well. It only becomes a problem for you, even though you know your material like the back of your hand, if you’re not exactly well-known on the Net yet.

The good thing is there is one tried-and-true method of building your credibility in a flash. Just borrow credibility from people you know other people trust. Those are the experts in their field who have credentials to follow their names. Sure, there are people with PhDs and there are people with multimillion dollar businesses behind them. They’re great sources of information. But we’re also talking about academics, bloggers and book authors who spend a long time deeply immersed in their fields.

Continue reading here

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source article: http://wordpreneur.com/16197/the-single-fastest-way-to-build-credibility-as-a-virtually-unknown-writer/

04/22/2014

The Many Micro and Mega-Aggressions of the Publishing Industry


enhanced-26531-1397235923-1My research of author (AND musician, composer, director, teacher, mentor – among many other things), Daniel Jose Older, revealed an insightful, energetic, multi-talented, compassionate and passionate individual. When I stumbled upon him I was numbed into a trance-like state and couldn’t stop reading about him.

He has written a thought-provoking piece, culled from his memory and experiences during his journey with and through the publishing industry.

“A young writer that I mentor reached out to me last week. “None of these agents look like me,” she said, “and they don’t represent anyone that looks like me.” She’s wrapping up a final draft of her first novel and I’d told her to research literary agencies to get a feel for what’s out there. “What if they don’t get what I’m doing?”

I thought back over the many interactions I’d had with agents – all but two of them white – before I landed with mine. The ones that said they loved my writing but didn’t connect with the character, the ones that didn’t think my book would be marketable even though it was already accepted at a major publishing house. Thought about the ones that wanted me to delete moments when a character of color gets mean looks from white people because “that doesn’t happen anymore” and the white magazine editor who lectured me on how I’d gotten my own culture wrong. My friends all have the same stories of whitewashed covers and constant sparring with the many micro and mega-aggressions of the publishing industry.

“I don’t know,” I said. Useless words, but it was all I had in that moment. I don’t. There are so many paths to success, so many meanings of the concept, and race and power complicate the equation infinitely. It’s not enough for writers of color to learn craft, we need to navigate the impossible waters of an unwelcoming industry. I flailed for words that would prepare her for all that lay ahead; none came.”

— Daniel Jose Older

 

And you thought YOU had a hard time in the publishing clusterfuck🙂 Getting your writing published is hard enough with all the unnecessary, man-made, intrinsic roadblocks – they didn’t need to add one’s skin color to the already dastardly milieu.

— John R. Austin

 

Read this unique and heartfelt publishing experience  by Daniel Jose Older, published in BuzzFeed:

 

Diversity Is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing 

 

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