Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

08/29/2011

Apple iPad vs Samsung Galaxy – Who’s Infringing Who? – More Intrigue


Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

Growing intrigue in the tablet computer world! The two best tablets on the market are jostling for position and sales … with each throwing accusations at the other RE copyright infringement.

Apple, scared stiff of the more advanced Android based OS of the Galaxy, started firing infringement violations at Samsung and now Samsung is shooting back with counter copyright infringement lawsuits against Apple.

Neat. I am looking forward to the resulting best, cutting edge solution for the consumer.

Latest developments by Luke Hopewell for ZDNet:

Samsung fires back in Apple Oz Galaxy suit

Update In the latest developments in the ongoing patent saga between Samsung and Apple, Samsung today revealed a plan to countersue Apple for patent infringement within its flagship iPad tablet while pledging to push back its official launch date to the end of next month.

Legal representatives from both parties met for a directions hearing in the NSW Federal Court today, where barrister David Catterns, acting for Samsung, revealed to the court a plan to countersue Apple once the case made it to trial.

“Our cross claim will include a cross claim of infringement for a number of our patents that have been infringed by their [Apple’s] iPad,” Catterns told Justice Annabelle Bennett today, adding in a statement that its counter-claim would also encompass the Apple iPhone.

Apple Australia originally sued Samsung after it felt that the gadget maker was infringing on its patents in its upcoming Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. Samsung contested the allegation, saying that Apple Australia was basing its claims on the US version of the Galaxy Tab 10.1. The two parties at the time agreed to an undertaking that would see Samsung hold its shipment of the Australian version of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 until Apple had the chance to study three of the units, seven days before the proposed release of the device to market.

Apple Australia told the court that it had received the units last Thursday, and had until this Thursday to complete its investigation. Representatives acting for Apple Australia told the court that they had found two patents that Samsung had allegedly violated, in the investigation process, that support the Apple case. Apple Australia has also added another patent to the laundry list of existing alleged infringements.

The interlocutory relief originally agreed to in the legal stoush expires on Thursday, with the court hearing that unless Apple can acquire further relief in the case, Samsung could easily launch its tablet on Friday.

Catterns, acting for Samsung, told the court that the company had intended to release the device on the week of 12 September, most likely on the Thursday or Friday, but, due to uncertainty in the legal proceedings, Samsung agreed to push the release of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 until the week of 30 September to allow for legal action to proceed. Samsung also agreed that it would give Apple Australia 48 hours’ notice before releasing the device to market.

Catterns added that any further interlocutory relief in the form of an injunction would be inappropriate and biased against Samsung, adding that Apple has failed to submit any real evidence to the court support its case.

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03/23/2011

Tablet Computer World to Explode to 200 Million/Yr Sales by 2014!


More Tablet Computers Coming!

Good news for writers and publishers…but a vastly more crowded dance floor for the Apple iPad.

Why is this good news for writers and publishers?

Simply because of the HUGE rebirth in the popularity of reading that the tablets (as well as the singular e-readers such as Kindle) have generated.

AND, the resulting demand for constant new content.

PLUS, the ease and speed of access to books and all other written media COUPLED with the ever-increasing streamlining of the actual publishing process.  

I have some numbers tonight that will rock your socks! A study conducted by PRTM (PRTM = Pittiglio, Rabin, Todd & McGrath, by the way) claims that there are 104 tablets currently for sale or in development. With 17 million tablets sold in 2010, PRTM forecasted 200 million tablets to be sold annually for 2014!

How bout them figures? 

Stefanie Botelho writes these details in FOLIO magazine: 

Tablet Market Expands With New Competitors

Samsung and RIM will release tablets within the next four months.

RIM and Samsung have announced release dates for their versions of the tablet computer, with the RIM Blackberry Playbook on sale on April 19th and the new Wi-Fi version of the Samsung Galaxy tablet line launching June 8th.

Both companies are looking to grab a hold of a piece of the iPad-dominated tablet market. Apple’s second version of the iPad was unveiled in San Francisco on March 2nd, and shipped March 11th. Reportedly, Apple sold 14.8 million iPads in 2010.

The RIM PlayBook will feature a 7 inch screen, Flash compatible video and front and rear cameras. The 16GB version will be available for $499, a 32GB for $599 and a 64GB with a price tag of $699.

The PlayBook will have Wi-Fi capabilities, but they cannot utilize 3G without being connected through a Blackberry phone.

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11/13/2010

The Samsung Galaxy Tab Challenges Apple’s iPad

Filed under: Apple iPad,electronic tablets,John R. Austin,Samsung Galaxy,WSJ — gator1965 @ 3:51 pm

I often post on electronic gadgets that are useful to writers and publishers. The iPad and now it’s first credible challenger from Samsung, the Galaxy Tab, are such devices.

I love certain aspects of the Galaxy over the iPad…It’s more compact size and lighter weight, for one. It can be handled in one hand versus two for the iPad with a screen size of 7″ compared with iPad’s 9.7″. Also, the Galaxy includes the three most-requested features missing in the iPad: a camera (two in fact), the ability to run Web videos and applications written in Adobe’s Flash software and multitasking.

This report comes from Walter S. Mossberg in the Wall Street Journal:

After seven months of unchallenged prominence, Apple’s hot-selling iPad now has its first credible competitor in the nascent market for multitouch consumer tablet computers: the Samsung Galaxy Tab.

The Tab is being introduced over the next week by three major U.S. wireless phone carriers at $400 with a cellular data contract, or at $600 with cellular capability but no contract. The iPad starts at $499 for a Wi-Fi model with no cellular-data capability or contract, and is $629 for the least expensive model with cellular data capability but no contract.

Like the iPad, the Tab, which uses Google’s Android operating system, is a good-looking slate with a vivid color screen that can handle many of the tasks typically performed on a laptop. These include email, social networking, Web browsing, photo viewing, and music and video playback. It also can run a wide variety of third-party apps. But it has major differences, most notably in size.

The Tab has a 7-inch screen versus the 9.7-inch display on the iPad. That may seem like a small difference, but the numbers are deceptive, because screen sizes are always described using diagonal measurements. In fact, the actual screen real estate on the Tab is less than half of the iPad’s. That’s a disadvantage, but it allows the overall unit to be much smaller and lighter, and thus more easily used in one hand, something some users will welcome.

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06/16/2010

Mobile Publishing Has a Ticket to Ride!



There is a plan afoot that just might rescue magazines and newspapers from a slow death and make them readily available online and profitable to boot!

The rescue is being carried out by the mobile digital devices flooding the market recently and the new mobiles waiting in the wings…such as the Dell Streak or the Samsung Galaxy.

John Kennedy writes this in the SiliconRepublic.com:

Watch out Apple CEO Steve Jobs, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is now in the digital news reader market having acquired Skiff, a Hearst-backed tech start-up that helps distribute newspaper and magazine content and could provide stiff competition to the iPad.

Murdoch has been one of the strongest proponents of building paywalls around newspapers and wants to follow on the success of successful properties like the Wall Street Journal and The Times of London.

Murdoch has acquired Skiff LLU (pictured above), a maker of a flexible news reader device, as well as a company called Journalism Online LLC, which is developing technology that helps publishers collect micro-payments from readers online.

He hopes that both acquisitions will lend support to his quest to help newspaper publishers be as profitable online as they once were in print.

The Skiff digital reader which Murdoch plans to bring to market later this year features an 11.5-inch grayscale touchscreen that allows users to download material wirelessly from Skiff’s online store.

The first material to feature on the Skiff digital reader will be the Financial Times, the New York Times, Forbes, Popular Mechanics, Random House and Simon & Schuster. The technology could also be licensed out to hardware from other manufacturers, appearing perhaps as an app on an Android phone or tablet computer.

Mobile publishing business to boom
The mobile publishing business is about to go stellar thanks to devices like the Apple iPad which have allowed publishers to redefine how news and magazine content is delivered online via apps. Magazines and newspapers that have delivered breakthrough iPad apps include Wired, Time magazine and the Financial Times, while news apps like the Pulse Reader, BBC News, Reuters News Pro and AP News are breaking new ground in online news distribution.

The online advertising side of the coin is also hard to ignore. Last week, Apple revealed that its iAd platform already has US$60m in ad bookings – 50pc of all North America’s mobile ads for H2 2010.

Quite rightly this has online publishers worried about whether they will be excluded from Apple’s devices – now almost 60pc of all mobile devices in the US – and led to the CEO of Google’s recently acquired AdMob expressing his concerns over recent changes to Apple’s terms for app developers.

Either way, for such a young market, the energy and competition about to be unleashed is mesmerising and with new devices entering the fray all the time like the Dell Streak or the Samsung Galaxy, a whole new paradigm in publishing is about to be unleashed with News Corp, Apple and Google currently leading the land grab.

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