Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

05/09/2015

The Int’l Assoc. Of STM Publishers – Do They Have a Conflict of Interest Viewpoint?


The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers’ (STM) three-day Annual U.S. Conference 2015  was held in Washington, DC last week; AND many of the keynote speakers took offense at the copious growing calls for changes/fairness in this lucrative publishing sector.

Are they fighting inevitable change? I think so.

One thing I’ve always championed in academic research is the fair treatment of the research authors. They are not fairly compensated and actually have to pay to get their articles published in ‘recognized’ academic journals that are highly compensated from almost hijacked scholarly institutions, libraries, etc. I also firmly believe in Open Access academic publishing to level the playing/political field between academia, academic publishers and the actual research authors.

Excerpt from Gavin Simpson as posted in ‘Bottom of the Heap‘ under Science:

“The cost of subscribing to academic journals: Much has been written about the Research Works Act [you could do a lot worse than read Saurodpod Mike on the subject], academic publishing and the relationship between the scientists who do most of the work and the publishers who then assert somewhat draconian rights over those works. A boycott of the biggest publisher of them all, Elsevier, started to gain a fair degree of traction with almost 8000 scientists having pledged to limit some or all of their interactions with Elsevier and its journals.

One of the allegations levelled at Elsevier is that they charge such exorbitant prices for subscriptions to their journals that they essentially force university libraries to subscribe to so-called “bundles” or “deals” that allow access to huge swathes of titles. Accessing all those titles individually would be prohibitively costly for any institution, but by offering bundles, STEM publishers are accused of exploiting the high prices of their most popular titles to foist titles onto users and librarians that have no need for them.”

Read the following research/resource article for tonight, make up your own mind Re the keynote speaker’s stance and please offer your comments.

 

STM’s Hot Button Issues: Open Access, Data and Social Media

By Paula Gantz:

According to discussions at the Int’l Assoc. of STM Publishers conference, OA and data-driven articles need more scrutiny, even as scholars open up online.

Trends and new approaches that are reinvigorating science, technical and medical publishing were explored last week at the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers’ (STM) three-day Annual U.S. Conference 2015 in Washington, DC.

Blasting Open Access

Setting an inspiring tone for the conference, Jeff Beale, scholarly communications librarian at University of Colorado,

JEFFREY BEALL

Denver, lambasted Open Access in his keynote address on the first day.

“Most of the information about Open Access comes from Open Access advocates and furthers their aims and goals, and it is misleading, he said. The Open Access movement has spawned a host of predatory publishers who are causing a breakdown in the research culture globally. “It is giving rise to counterfeit, junk science promoting non-approved products,” he maintained.

Beale likened Gold Open Access, where the author pays, to graffiti. He chastised “unfair government legislation” that essentially “eliminates freedom of the press by favoring one business model over another.”

He urged academic publishers to persevere in their resistance to Open Access mandates, suggesting that they stick with Green Open Access or maybe a single Open Access journal to silence advocates.

Beale also reprimanded librarians for being Open Access supporters, and turning a blind eye to predatory publishers because it is not politically correct.

Beale maintains a blog which lists predatory publishers, hijacked journals and misleading metrics companies. There are over 700 publishers on his list. He particularly called attention to hijacked journals which target real journals with impact factors. “They even copy the addresses and telephone numbers of the journals. Most of their authors think that they have published in an impact factor journal.”

Pushing Back Against Data

The keynote speaker on the second day, Christine L. Borgman, presidential chair in information studies at UCLA and

CHRISTINE BORGMAN

author of “Big Data, Little Data, No Data,” defined data as representations of observations, objects or other entities used as evidence of phenomena for the purposes of research or scholarship.

“Publications are arguments made by authors, and data are evidence used to support the arguments. You can use data to support different arguments. This is where the publication-data relationship breaks down, by assuming that one set of data produces one paper,” she pointed out.

According to Borgman, data is not easily definable because they are compound objects and ownership is rarely clear. Authorship is also a problem; attribution might make more sense. “The concept of authorship needs definition,” she said.

She also observed that most open data is not very useful and not very marked-up.

“I have been pushing back at the metaphor of publishing data. Are we going to curate, preserve and steward data? Data are not peer-reviewed usually,” she remarked. “There is the assumption that communities will put data in repositories, but this assumes that researchers are going to share data. That is the most problematic assumption of all. The labor to document data is not economically rewardable. It is not in scientists’ interests to release to an unknown other, and there is a lack of incentives to reuse data.”

Borgman urged the publishing industry to focus on the important skills of data curation and stewardship. She also warned that data repositories are funded on three to five year grants and are frequently at risk of going dark for lack of investment.

 

 

 

Social Media Matters in STM, Too

Cassidy R. Sugimoto, assistant professor at Indiana University, focused the third day’s keynote onaltmetrics, social

Cassidy R. Sugimoto

media and researcher behavior in light of these trends. She suggested that people no longer want to remain anonymous and are building their reputations through social media. But she voiced a fear that time spent on creating digital reputations might detract from time spent on academic research.

Sugimoto suggested that there is a need to capture the heterogeneity of researcher behavior that expands beyond pure publication. This will lead to better metrics that can improve scholarship. She pointed to mentoring as one of the uncaptured metrics.

“The altmetrics movement has failed to do what it promised to do,” she stated. “Altmetrics needs a far greater protocol and greater validity. Altmetrics have been around for five years, but still only looks at the impact of publications. Nothing has been made visible that wasn’t before.”

She suggested eliminating the term “alt” and focusing on the validity of metrics; refining how they are captured and evaluated, which might require human intervention.

“Maybe tweets are not important. May they just have to do with humor value and not scientific exchange. We have to think about what’s being tweeted and also who is tweeting. Sometimes it’s organizations. Sometimes it’s bots,” she observed.

Sugimoto commented that open peer review has largely failed, but it is not true that researchers are not active online. “Researchers need to be incentivized. We need to think about micro-reviewing too, so that the process does not demand as much.”

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11/11/2013

Academic Publishing – Streamlining Access to Research Data


Academic Publishing moving into fast lane

Academic publishing, also referred to as STM (Scientific, Technical and Medical) publishing, is getting a revved up engine and moving into the fast lane through a collaborative effort by Thompson Reuters and the Australian National Data Service (ANDS).

All of us who have done research for academic degrees, or for any other pure research mission, understand how important ‘data sets’ or repositories of information relating to our research topic are. In the past, finding the data to research was often a research project in itself!

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters is in the process of creating a Data Citation Index to harness and bring together global data sets so research done in other countries can be more easily accessed, furthered and given proper credit. ‘Currently, the Data Citation Index contains approximately 3.5 million data records from nearly 130 repositories.’ I love it!

ANDS is one of a growing number of institutions included in the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index.

More details provided by Knowledge Speak, the daily intelligence resource for the STM publishing industry:

US Thomson Reuters collaborates with Australian National Data Service to aid in the discovery of global data sets

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters has announced a collaboration with Australian National Data Service (ANDS) to aid in the discovery of global data sets. The collaboration connects researchers to data repositories through the Data Citation Index, a single-point solution providing access to quality research data sets from multi-disciplinary repositories worldwide.

ANDS is one of a growing number of institutions included in the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index. The collaboration ensures that Australian research is discoverable, properly attributed and reusable by other researchers. The influx of data from Australia also provides a wealth of new content that can be cited and furthered by researchers around the world.

continued

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02/03/2012

Academic Publishing and The Free and Easy Movement of Information


Big Journal Publishers Bullying Academic Researchers

More tonight on the growing revolution among academics RE academic publishing. Please refer to my Writers Welcome Blog post Academic Publishing is a Good Gig if You Can Get It – And a Rip Off for Creators for more background.

Researchers may even have to pay to get their work published in prestigious journals (some probably do already) in order to keep costs from being sky-high to consumer readers of scientific journals.

Damn, imagine charging cash-strapped youngsters for publishing new research data! That’s akin to charging Matt Damon for the privilege of performing on-screen rather than paying him for his on-screen content.

These put upon and victimized, young researchers are rated by and advance their careers according to how often they publish and the reputation of the journals they publish in – Sort of like extortion, slave labor and stealing candy from babies, if you ask me 😦

This enlightening piece is from The Economist

The price of information

Academics are starting to boycott a big publisher of journals

SOMETIMES it takes but a single pebble to start an avalanche. On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top-ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics’s equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow-mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers’s post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier’s journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands.

A bundle of trouble

Dr Gowers’s immediate gripes are threefold. First, that Elsevier charges too much for its products. Second, that its practice of “bundling” journals forces libraries which wish to subscribe to a particular publication to buy it as part of a set that includes several others they may not want. And third, that it supports legislation such as the Research Works Act, a bill now before America’s Congress that would forbid the government requiring that free access be given to taxpayer-funded research.

Elsevier insists it is being misrepresented. The firm is certainly in rude financial health. In 2010 it made a £724m ($1.16 billion) profit on revenues of £2 billion, a margin of 36%. But it charges average industry prices for its products, according to Nick Fowler, its director of global academic relations, and its price rises have been lower than those imposed by other publishers over the past few years. Elsevier’s enviable margins, Dr Fowler says, are simply a consequence of the firm’s efficient operation.

Read and learn more

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10/06/2010

New Digital Publisher Hires "Harry Potter" Publisher


Open Road, a year-old digital publisher, is entering the children’s eBook market…and for starters they have acquired Barbara Marcus, the former children’s book publisher at Scholastic publishing…The one who secured the Harry Potter books!

Quite a coup.

Matthew Flamm reports this for Crain’s New York Business:

Digital publisher Open Road hires Barbara Marcus, the former Scholastic children’s book president who brought the Hero of Hogwarts to the world, as an adviser.

Open Road, the year-old digital publishing startup founded by Jane Friedman to focus primarily on backlist titles, has hired Harry Potter’s former publisher in an effort to break into children’s books.

Barbara Marcus, who was president of children’s book publishing and distribution at Scholastic until 2005, has been named an advisor for children’s publishing to Open Road Integrated Media. The announcement was made Wednesday at the Frankfurt Book Fair by Ms. Friedman, the onetime HarperCollins boss who is co-founder and chief executive of the New York City-based startup.

Ms. Marcus oversaw Scholastic’s acquisition of the first title in J. K. Rowling’s wildly popular series, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, which came out in 1998. She stayed on through the publication of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, No. 6 in the series.

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