Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

05/05/2014

Borrowing Credibility = Intelligent, Instant Marketing for Newbie Writers


“Damn, guys, I met Stephen King at a conference last week and you would be surprised what he told me about the tricks he used to get published for the first time!”

This statement will perk up your listeners’ ears and they will hang on and pay more attention to every word you say after that opening statement — simply because you are paraphrasing a credible source and not just spouting your own words (even though your own words may be just as knowledgeable and accurate on the subject matter).

And, you don’t have to meet credible, renowned personalities in-person — you can read their advice and teachings in articles and quote them as well.

Borrowing credibility lends instant marketing value to your content. A simple but powerful concept that is often overlooked or not appreciated and therefore not strategically applied.

More insight provided by Al Bargen from Wordpreneur dot com:

 

The Single Fastest Way to Build Credibility as a Virtually Unknown Writer

Okay, so you feel that practically nobody knows who you are. How do you expect people to read your book or blog post and believe what you’re saying? That’s a question we get a lot at my site, and people want to know how to become a credible source of information when they haven’t yet built a name for themselves.

The problem isn’t that these people (you?) are not credible sources of information. They’re usually just as credible as the first guy at the head of the popularity contest. But therein lies the problem. Credibility isn’t so much about being able to know what you’re talking about. It has much more to do with being the more popular source of information out there.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing as most people who become well-known as great sources of information are also people who know their stuff really well. It only becomes a problem for you, even though you know your material like the back of your hand, if you’re not exactly well-known on the Net yet.

The good thing is there is one tried-and-true method of building your credibility in a flash. Just borrow credibility from people you know other people trust. Those are the experts in their field who have credentials to follow their names. Sure, there are people with PhDs and there are people with multimillion dollar businesses behind them. They’re great sources of information. But we’re also talking about academics, bloggers and book authors who spend a long time deeply immersed in their fields.

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source article: http://wordpreneur.com/16197/the-single-fastest-way-to-build-credibility-as-a-virtually-unknown-writer/

06/12/2013

Delving Deeper Into the New Professional Publishing Ecosystem


Delving deeper into new publishing ecosystem

The changing publishing system is about so much more than just ebooks and print books — and what each of these ‘formats’ (and that’s ALL they are – just formats of the ‘printed word’) are doing to each other or to the publishing industry in general.

There has been some real structural changes to writing and publishing processes that enable some truly amazing things — and these changes are not related so much to past publishing industry changes as to entirely new concepts that were just not foreseeable in the ‘Gutenberg past’ that so many can’t seem to shake out of; especially when arguing ‘publishing-change-that-really-isn’t-change-but-just-an-extension-of-past-changes’.

“Draft”, a streamlined online word processor with version control, seems to be a good place to attempt this, hopefully, enlightening discussion:

By Eric Eldon in Tech Crunch:

 

In Writing Platform Push, Draft Lets You Collaborate Then Publish Anywhere

Draft, a streamlined online word processor with version control, is getting deeper into the new professional publishing ecosystem.

The one-man team of Nathan Kontny has just introduced a new REST API that’ll let any news outfit or other publishing organization connect Draft to the other software it uses. If you’re BuzzFeed or The Huffington Post* or another media company with a big mix of full- and part-time writers, you could use the API to let writers and editors work through versions together in Draft then publish straight to your custom content management system.

Meanwhile, if you’re running a group blog using a standard setup from WordPress or Blogger and you want a more pristine, versioned environment, Draft now lets you publish from it to them.

Since launching in March, it has also added features to publish to Tumblr, Twitter and most recently LinkedIn and MailChimp (which should be particularly useful to content marketers).

Beyond publishing out, Kontny has also made it much easier to pull in content for a draft. He’s added audio and video transcription, a two-way sync tool with file storage services like Dropbox, Evernote, and Google Drive, and a Chrome extension that lets you pull text into a new or existing draft.

Pulling in content

The updates have been coming fast. He’s also built commenting so collaborators can discuss specific sections of a draft, and simple social analytics that let you measure tweets about your writing based on word count, day of the week and reading comprehension level.

Draft, and private-beta competitors like Editorially and Poetica (please invite me, folks) are trying to create a new writing-centric platform to go along with the leading publishing tools of the day. It plays friendly with publishing tools, but isn’t trying to deal with website design and hosting or massive backend content management.

The API and publishing options, the transcription and syncing tools, and comments all help it toward that goal.

I have a suggestion…

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04/10/2011

There’s No Such Thing as Easy in the Writing Biz!


Joanna Penn is one of my favorite mentors and I have learned a great deal of insight from her. Two days ago she had a guest post on her Creative Penn site by Grant McDuling titled “Write For A Living In Seven Easy Steps”

While reading this post, two things struck me right off…First, I thought, NOTHING is easy in the writing business world; unless it happens by accident, it seems!

And second, after Mr. McDuling lists his seven easy writing steps (which I respectfully disagree with as being easy and are much too broad and generic), he goes on to say (and rightfully so) that “Launching out on your own in business – any business – takes courage and a great deal of faith in your own abilitiesJohn’s Note: and here comes the kicker: But it also takes a whole lot more; money, discipline, dedication and even, some would say, madness. But there’s another absolutely important ingredient that no university, school or college teaches, and that’s ATTITUDE. You have to think of yourself as a businessperson and not a writer. You are a businessperson whose business happens to be making a profit – through selling words.”

All true enough. But even MORE true is Mr. McDuling’s statement about it taking a lot more than intimated in the seven easy steps…and included in this “more” is money, discipline, dedication and even, some would say, madness…The money part is especially true. 

I loved the post, though, because it got my juices going!

Write For A Living In 7 Easy Steps (from the Creative Penn):

This is a guest post from ghostwriter Grant McDuling. You can also listen to an audio interview with Grant on making 6 figures as a writer here.

As a full time writer, I get asked so many times by all sorts of people what it takes to give up the day job to become a full time writer. This was a question I too had pondered long and hard years ago.

You see, I had been dabbling in writing since a school boy back in the 1960s and always felt this inner urge or compulsion to write. But as time went on and I grew up, realizing this goal became harder and harder because I found myself going down a path I didn’t want but had to pursue because commitments came along that had to be tended to. Commitments like paying the rent, buying food, paying off a car, to mention but a few.

The road to becoming a full time writer seemed to be an impossible one to follow — until I couldn’t resist the urge any longer and decided to do something positive about it.

My experience in the business world convinced me that, if I was to be serious about it, I would have to treat writing just like any other business. I was going to have to set about developing a plan of action.

This I did, but mostly by relying on non-business-like behavior; a healthy dose of enthusiasm mixed with gut feel and a liberal sprinkling of trial and error got me to the point where I at least had a system to work with. And it was a system based on business lines.

This gave me the courage to take the proverbial plunge, and I have never looked back.

So what was my system?

In simple terms, it consisted of 7 basic steps:

(1) Take control of your own future. Here I am referring to assuming responsibility for your own future. And become accountable. Have a plan to get rid of debt. You can read more about this in my Kindle book Write for a Living in 7 Easy Steps

(2) Getting into the writing profession needs the right ATTITUDE. It’s about seeing yourself as a professional writer.

(3) Become a PRACTICING writer. Just like lawyers or doctors are in private practice, so too must you be. Understand and make use of the principle of leverage to achieve more with less. Syndication is a good example here.

(4) Concentrate on sales and marketing. Understand that, as a practicing writer, you should be spending around 50% of your time on sales and marketing.

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