Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

01/06/2014

Google Screwing Content Creators? Yes – But Change is in the Air


Google needs to be checked at times

Just like Craigslist devastated local classified advertising in newspapers, Google has also chipped away large chunks of advertising revenue from newspapers by ‘copying’ original content from newspaper articles and displaying it in their search results without compensating the newspapers and original content creators!

“Simply put, Google has not done enough to aid the newspaper industry. If the company continues their profiteering ways at the expense of original content creators, more papers will fold and less content will be created.” – Michael Kozlowski

Actually that first sentence in the quote above SHOULD read that Google has not justifiably compensated news sources for using their content. It has nothing to do with ‘aiding’. Newspaper content, if it is not already, should be considered copyrighted material with agreements for ‘fair use’ by the usual players — BUT, I don’t consider Google (or any other internet behemoths) using the work of others to make large advertising profits for themselves, at the expense of the original content creators and without proper compensation, a case of ‘fair use’.

Google apparently has woken up a little (with prodding) and has entered into commercial agreements to establish a €60m digital innovation fund that will help local news companies start to monetize their newspapers in digital form. This will allow media organizations to profit from Google advertizing platforms such as AdSense and AdMob for mobile phones.

More details provided in tonight’s interesting source article from Good E Reader by :

 

Has Google Demolished the Newspaper Industry?

There has been quite a number of journalists weighing in on the role Google plays in the newspaper industry. The company has made billions of dollars of advertising revenue at the expense of content creators. The newspaper industry has lost billions of dollars in the last 10 years, which is directly proportionate to the sheer growth Google has garnered .  Should Google be doing more for the newspaper industry?

In 2011 Google made 37.9 billion dollars, of which 96% derived from advertising. Each quarter from 2012 to 2013 earned Google 14 billion dollars on average with the same amount coming from their core advertising market. “Our top 25 advertisers are spending over $150 million per year” on Google’s ads business such as search, display and YouTube, said a Google Spokesman . Currently Google accounts for more than 41% of U.S. digital ad revenues, according to eMarketer.

When Google first introduced their Adwords platform in the year 2000, newspapers in the US peaked at $48 billion dollars from direct advertising. This has since declined to 18.9 billion in 2012. It is painfully obvious that most advertisers are getting more bang for their buck by advertising on the internet, instead of physical papers.

In the last few months many of techs leading innovators is trying to help journalism reach new heights and put a priority in the dailies. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos acquired the Washington Post for $250 million, then eBay founder Pierre Omidyar promised to spend a similar amount on a brand-new media entity called First Look Media.   Google so far as done nothing to give back to the industry.

Many European countries are not taking the advertising market share of Google laying down.  Google generates an estimated €1.5 billion, or $2 billion, in France.  The government is irate that the company pays almost no taxes in France, and instead is going to Belgium and Ireland. “We want to work to ensure that Europe is not a tax haven for a certain number of Internet giants,” the digital economy minister, Fleur Pellerin mentioned.

Article continues here

This Publishing/Writing Blog is available on Kindle 🙂

Advertisements

08/11/2012

Insight Into How SEO Affects Publishing and Content (and Ultimately Book Marketing)


In days prior, one who understood how to juggle (fool) the search engines with keywords, etc. could fool robot search crawlers into promoting shit content into digital/online best sellers.

Well, google is working to make content king in publishing once again with last year’s Panda release and the more recent Penguin release. Google is going to flip SEO on its head.

How will they ever find the algorithms or formulas to rank content itself? 

Details are provided by Yaron Galai [you’ll find this guy quite interesting 🙂 ] in AdAge.com :

How Google’s ‘Penguin’ Update Will Change Publishing, for the Better

Over the past decade, the publishing industry been swinging on a pendulum created by the effects of search engine optimization (SEO). In the old, primarily print days, the most successful publishers were those that could produce great content for a specific audience and keep that audience engaged via subscriptions or at the newsstands. More recently, the kings of publishing were those that could best engage web crawlers and monetize their sites through a windfall of free search traffic. The focus has been less on creating great content and engaging readers than on producing lots of words on lots of pages to engage web crawlers.

But there is a silver lining to all of this. With last year’s Panda release, and the more recent Penguin release, Google is going to flip SEO on its head. If Old SEO enabled some to fool a crawler into indexing borderline junk content to get high rankings, New SEO looks likely to take any notion of fooling anyone out of the equation. 

New SEO will put all publishers on more equal footing, favoring those that produce quality content that is highly engaging to a certain audience. If SEO was previously a linear method of feeding a crawler with words and links, Google’s results are now the result of a feedback loop: show them that you can produce quality content that people are attracted to, and free search traffic will follow. 

There are two ways for a user to arrive at content — the first is actively searching for it on a search engine like Google or Bing. The second is to discover or stumble onto it via a link on another website, an e-mail from a friend, a link shared on Twitter or Facebook, etc. “Discovery” encompasses all those times we reach a page without first typing a keyword into a search box.

Read and learn more

This Publishing/Writing Blog is available on Kindle :)))

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: