Publishing/Writing: Insights, News, Intrigue

10/31/2012

New York Publishing Blown Away By Hurricane Sandy


Hurricane Sandy Devastates NY Publishing

Let’s pull our head out of the digital publishing world for a bit and take an insightful look-see into what happened to the three-dimensional physical publishing world after hurricane Sandy came crashing through New York on 29th October 2012. 

This takes you right through the flooded streets and publishing offices in New York and lets us peek into a little decision-making RE The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal among others.

Adweek article by Lucia Moses:

Publishing World Muddles Through Storm

Sandy wreaks havoc on city’s dailies

It was a storm even the most prepared media companies couldn’t totally anticipate. Hurricane Sandy stymied efforts by The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal this morning to deliver to Manhattanites who still prefer the ink-on-paper version (assuming customers even had light to read it by), while the storm’s aftermath disrupted many of the major publishing houses.

The storm’s timing, along with road, tunnel and bridge closures, prevented the Times from getting into Manhattan from its College Point, N.Y., plant, although deliveries were made to parts of Long Island, Queens and Brooklyn.

The Times gets about one-third of its circulation from New York state, or some 236,842 copies.

“We are making every effort to distribute as transportation issues improve,” a spokeswoman said.

There was no home delivery of the Journal in Manhattan and only a limited number of single copies made it to newsstands, a rep there said.

Those with Internet access could still get information online from the Times as well as The Wall Street Journal, which lowered their paywalls today for the second day in a row so readers could get storm and recovery information. A Journal rep said WSJ.com would be free again on Wednesday.

The storm has had varying effects on other publishing houses, which remained closed or advised employees to work from home for the second day in a row today.

Dennis Publishing’s The Week had to set up shop in a conference room at a Residence Inn across the street from its offices in order to meet its Wednesday press deadline. “Our entire edit team had to hand-carry their computers and servers down five flights of stairs,” president Steven Kotok emailed. “We rebuilt the servers in the hotel conference room.”

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07/10/2012

A Disregard for Intellectual Property Among the Younger Generation? Prevalent Piracy


Give me your content, Mate!

The digital highways and byways are becoming more and more crowded with mobile devices. These wonderful little gadgets are a boon to publishers in providing multiple avenues to get their content out in front of more readers/consumers. 

The mobiles also bring a downside, however — increased piracy! Seems these little devils, multiplying like horny energizer bunnies, are hard to police. ‘It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.’

You ask, “What the hell is a Bit Torrent site?” [I had to ask that question :)] Well, here is the definition link .

Lucia Moses provides some insight into how digital magazines are being ripped off through their mobile apps in this piece for Adweek

Publishers’ Online Headache

With tablets come opportunity, but also online piracy

With mobile devices, magazines have more ways than ever to distribute their content—and more ways of getting ripped off.

Like the music and movie businesses before them, magazines are getting their own taste of piracy with the spread of tablets and handheld mobile devices. It’s easy for thieves to digitally swipe magazine issues and post to BitTorrent sites.

Publishers say piracy is concentrated overseas where no sooner do they get a site shut down than another one pops up in its place. And with all the focus on distributing their content as widely as possible, they don’t really know the scope of the problem or what it’s costing them in lost sales.

“[It’s] a real problem for the future as we get a lot more of these devices out there and it becomes harder to police it,” said Declan Moore, president of publishing and digital media for the National Geographic Society. “There is a general concern that, among the younger generation, there is a disregard for intellectual property.”

With just a few keystrokes, he found an online search engine offering a full year’s worth of interactive Nat Geos (as well as what appeared to be a liberal selection of soft porn). “That’s not authorized, I’m pretty sure,” he said.

Dan Lagani, president of Reader’s Digest North America, said the pirated editions of Reader’s Digest that he sees tend to be lower-resolution and lack the interactivity that the magazine has built into its iPad, Kindle Fire and Nook versions. “It’s not the same consumer experience.”

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